Monday, August 19, 2013

Get a HUD Home for $100 Down

There are basically 5 popular 2017  Kentucky Home Buyer programs that Kentucky Home buyers use to purchase their first home.





At least 3%-5% down

Closing costs will vary on which rate you choose and the lender. Typically the higher the rate, the lesser closing costs due to the lender giving you a lender credit back at closing for over par pricing. Also, called a no-closing costs option. You have to weigh the pros and cons to see if it makes sense to forgo the lower rate and lower monthly payment for the higher rate and less closing costs.

Fico scores needed start at 620, but most conventional lenders will want a higher score to qualify for the 3-5% minimum down payment requirements Most buyers using this loan have high credit scores (over 720) and at least 5% down.

The rates are a little higher compared to FHA, VA, or USDA loan but the mortgage insurance is not for life of loan and can be rolled off when you reach 80% equity position in home.

Conventional loans require 4-7 years removed from Bankruptcy and foreclosure. 

Max Conventional loan limits are set at $424,00 for 2017 in Kentucky 



If you meet income eligibility requirements and are looking to settle in a rural area, you might qualify for the KY USDA Rural Housing program. The program guarantees qualifying loans, reducing lenders’ risk and encouraging them to offer buyers 100% loans. That means Kentucky home buyers don’t have to put any money down, and even the “upfront fee” (a closing cost for this type of loan) can be rolled into the financing.

Fico scores usually wanted for this program center around 620 range, with most lenders wanting a 640 score so they can obtain an automated approval through GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting system, and it will dictate your max loan pre-approval based on your income, credit scores, debt to income ratio and assets.

They also allow for a manual underwrite, which states that the max house payment ratios are set at 29% and 41% respectively of your income. 

They loan requires no down payment, and the current mortgage insurance is 1% upfront, called a funding fee, and .35% annually for the monthly mi payment. Since they recently reduced their mi requirements, USDA is one of the best options out there for home buyers looking to buy in an rural area.

A rural area typically will be any area outside the major cities of Louisville, Lexington, Paducah, Bowling Green, Richmond, Frankfort, and parts of Northern  Kentucky .

There is a map link below to see the qualifying areas.

There is also a max household income limits with most cutoff starting at $76,000 for a family of four, and up to $98,000 for a family of five or more.

USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy and foreclosure. 

There is no max USDA loan limit.


FHa loans are good for home buyers with lower credit scores and no much down, or with down payment assistance grants. FHA will allow for grants, gifts, for their 3.5% minimum investment and will go down to a 580 credit score. 

The current mortgage insurance requirements are kinda steep when compared to USDA, VA , but the rates are usually good so it can counteracts the high mi premiums. As I tell borrowers, you will not have the loan for 30 years, so don't worry too much about the mi premiums.

THe mi premiums are for life of loan like USDA.

FHA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and 3 years removed from foreclosure. 

Maximum FHA loan limits in Kentucky are set around $285,000 and below. 


VA loans are for veterans and active duty military personnel. The loan requires no down payment and no monthly mi premiums, saving you on the monthly payment. It does have an funding fee like USDA, but it is higher starting at 2% for first time use, and 3% for second time use. The funding fee is financed into the loan, so it is not something you have to pay upfront outof pocket. 

VA loans can be made anywhere, unlike the USDA restrictions, and there is no income household limit and the max loan is $417,000 in Kentucky 

Most VA lenders I work with will want a 620 credit score. 

VA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy or foreclosure. 




This type of loan is administered  by KHC in the state of Kentucky. They typically have $4500 to $6000 down payment assistance year around, that is in the form of a second mortgage that you pay back over 10 years.



Sometimes they will come to market with other down payment assistance and lower market rates to benefit lower income households with not a lot of money for down payment.

KHC offers FHA, VA, USDA, and Conventional loans with their minimum credit scores being set at 640 for all programs. The conventional loan requirements at KHC requires 680 credit score. 

The max debt to income ratios are set at 40% an 45% respectively. 



There are 4 basic things that a borrower needs to show a lender in order to get approved for a mortgage. Each category has so many what ifs and sub plots that each box can read as it’s own novel. In other words, each category has so many variables that can affect what it takes to get approved, but without further adieu here are the four categories in no particular order as each without any of these items, you're pretty much dead in the water:


1. Income

You need income. You need to be able to afford the home.  But what is acceptable income? Let’s just say that there are two ratios mortgage underwriters look at to qualify you for mortgage payment:

First Ratio – The first ratio, top ratio or housing ratio. Basically that means out of all the gross monthly income you make, that no more that X percent of it can go to your housing payment. The housing payment consists of Principle, Interest, Taxes and Insurance. Whether you escrow or not every one of these items are factored into your ratio. There are a lot of exceptions to how high you can go, but let’s just say that if your ratio is 33% or less, generally, across the board, you’re safe. 

Second Ratio- The second ratio, bottom ratio or debt ratio includes the housing payment, but also adds all of the monthly debts that the borrower has. So, it includes housing payment as well as every other debt that a borrower may have. This would include, Auto loans, credit cards, student loans, personal loans, child support, alimony….basically any consistent outgoing debt that you’re paying on. Again, if you’re paying less than 45% of your gross monthly income to all of the debts, plus your proposed housing payment, then……generally, you’re safe. You can go a lot higher in this area, but there are a lot of caveats when increasing your back ratio. 

What qualifies as income? Basically, it’s income that has at least a proven, two year history of being received and pretty high assurances that the income is likely to continue for at least three years. What’s not acceptable? Unverifiable cash income, short term income and income that’s not likely to continue like unemployment income, student loan aid,  VA education benefits,or short term disability are not allowed for a  mortgage loan.

2. Assets

What the mortgage underwriter is looking for here is how much can you put down and secondly, how much will you have in reserves after the loan is made to help offset any financial emergencies in the future.

Do you have enough assets to put the money forth to qualify for the down payment that the particular program asks for. The only 100% financing or no money down loans still available in Kentucky for  home buyers are available through USDA, VA, and KHC or Kentucky Housing Loans. Most other home buyers that don't qualify for the no money down home loans mentioned above, will turn to the FHA program. FHA loans currently requires a 3.5% down payment.

Kentucky Home buyers that have access to putting down at least 5% or more, will usually  turn to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac mortgage programs  so they can get better pricing when it comes to mortgage insurance.

These assets need to be validated through bank accounts, 401k or retirements account and sometimes gifts from relatives or employer.. Can you borrower the down payment? Sometimes. Generally if you’re borrowing a secured loan against a secured asset you can use that. But rarely can cash be used as an asset. FHA will allow for gifts from relatives  for down payments with little as 3.5% down but Fannie Mae will require a 20% down payment when a gift is being used for the down payment on the home.

The down payment scenarios listed above are for Kentucky Primary Residences only. There are stricter  down payment requirements for investment homes made in Kentucky.

 3. Credit

 640 is the bottom score (again with few exceptions) that lenders will permit. Below a 640, then you're in a world of hurt. Even at 640, people consider you a higher risk that other folks and are going to penalize you or your borrower with a more expensive loan. 720 is when you really start to get in the “as a lender we love you” credit score. 740 is even better. Watch your credit scores carefully. You have three credit scores and the lender will take your middle score. 

Kentucky  FHA Mortgage Loans currently requires 3 years removal from a foreclosure or short sale  and 2 years on a bankruptcy with good reestablished credit.

Kentucky Fannie Mae Mortgage Loans currently requires 4 years removal from a bankruptcy, and 7 years on a foreclosure.

Kentucky VA Mortgage Loans currently requires 2 years removal from a bankruptcy or foreclosure with good reestablished credit.

Kentucky USDA loans require 3 years removal from bankruptcy and foreclosure with good reestablished credit.



4. Appraisal

Generally, there’s nothing you can do to affect this. Bottom line here is…..”is the value of the house at least the value of what you’re paying for it?” If not, then not good things start to happen. Generally you’ll find less issues with values on purchase transactions, because, in theory, the realtor has done an accurate job of valuing the house prior to taking the listing. The big issue comes in refinancing. In purchase transactions, the value is determined as the

Lower of the value or the contract price!!!

That means that if you buy a $1,000,000 home for $100,000, the value is established at $100,000. Conversely, if you buy a $200,000 home and the value comes in at $180,000 during the appraisal, then the value is established at $180,000. Big issues….Talk to your loan officer.


For each one of these boxes, there are over 1,000 things that can effect if a borrower has reached the threshold to complete that box. Soooooooooooo…..talk to a great loan officer. There are so many loan officers that don’t know what they’re doing. But, conversely, there’s a lot of great ones as well. Your loan is so important! Get a great lender so that you know, for sure, that the loan you want, can be closed on!


I can answer your questions and usually get you pre-approved the same day. 


Call or Text me at 502-905-3708 with your mortgage questions.
Email Kentuckyloan@gmail.com







6 Don’ts After You Apply For A Mortgage


6 Don’ts After You Apply For A Mortgage


I learned a long time ago that “common sense is NOT common practice“. This is especially the case during the emotional time that surrounds buying a home, when people tend to do some non-commonsensical things. Here are a few that I’ve seen over the years that have delayed (and even killed) deals:
  1. Don’t deposit cash into your bank accounts. Lenders need to source your money and cash is not really traceable. Small, explainable deposits are fine, but getting $10,000 from your parents as a gift in cash is not. Discuss the proper way to track your assets with your loan officer.
  2. Don’t make any large purchases like a new car or a bunch of new furniture. New debt comes with it, including new monthly obligations. New obligations create new qualifications. People with new debt have higher ratios…higher ratios make for riskier loans…and sometimes qualified borrowers are no longer qualifying.
  3. Don’t co-sign other loans for anyone. When you co-sign, you are obligated. With that obligation comes higher ratios, as well. Even if you swear you won’t be making the payments, the lender will be counting the payment against you.
  4. Don’t change bank accounts. Remember, lenders need to source and track assets. That task is significantly easier when there is a consistency of accounts. Frankly, before you even transfer money between accounts, talk to your loan officer.
  5. Don’t apply for new credit. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a new credit card or a new car, when you have your credit report run by organizations in multiple financial channels (mortgage, credit card, auto, etc.), your FICO score will be affected. Lower credit scores can determine your interest rate and maybe even your eligibility for approval.
  6. Don’t close any credit accounts. Many clients have erroneously believed that having less available credit makes them less risky and more approvable. Wrong. A major component of your score is your length and depth credit history (as opposed to just your payment history) and your total usage of credit as a percentage of available credit. Closing accounts has a negative impact on both those determinants of your score.
The best advice is to fully disclose and discuss your plans with your loan officer before you do anything financial in nature. Any blip in income, assets, or credit should be reviewed and executed in a way to keep your application in the most positive light.














 


Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 MB73346


Text/call 502-905-3708
 kentuckyloan@gmail.com



The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of  my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
, NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). I lend in the following states: Kentucky











Get a HUD Home for $100 Down






If you can handle those qualifiers, here's the deal:
• You can only buy HUD homes. Go to the HUD Homes For Sale web page.
• You must use a HUD-registered real estate broker or agent.
• You must qualify for and use Federal Housing Administration (FHA) financing.
• You must plan to be an "owner-occupant," buying the property to live in and not as an investment.
• The home's purchase price must be no more than the appraised value of the property. If you bid a higher price you can pay the difference in cash, minus $100.
• The $100 down incentive must be on the executed contract. That means you have to specifically request the incentive. Your real estate agent should be aware of this provision.
• In some cases, HUD will also cover up to 3 percent of the closing costs.
• The $100 down payment program is eligible for the FHA 203(k) loans. The loans allow borrowers to use a portion of their purchase loan to repair and renovate run-down homes.
That's a good thing because HUD homes are sold in an "as-is" condition -- what you see is pretty much what you get. You could find a diamond in the rough or fool's gold. HUD homes often include a property condition report, but that is not a warranty.
The property report can resemble a home inspection report, but HUD home buyers are always encouraged to get a home inspection to determine just what "as is" is.




Apply for a home loan by clicking the link below:It's free and takes less than 5 minutesOr call us at 502-905-3708 for your free application over the phone