Showing posts with label credit karma. Show all posts
Showing posts with label credit karma. Show all posts

The Credit Report and Credit Scores Used For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval FHA, USDA, Fannie Mae and VA



A lot of buyers are hesitant about having their credit pulled because they think it will go down, whereas in most cases, scores are really the same with most mortgage lenders. Below I will try to explain to you what mortgage lenders use for credit qualifying scores and why you may have a different credit score and why some lenders may require a higher score than other lenders.

Lastly, each lender must pull their own credit report and cannot use another lender's credit report or the consumer's credit report. I will explain the reasoning below. 

Does shopping around for a mortgage hurt my credit?



No. Within a 45-day window, multiple credit checks from mortgage lenders are recorded on your credit report as a single inquiry. This is because other lenders realize that you are only going to buy one home. 

The impact on your credit is the same no matter how many lenders you consult, as long as the last credit check is within 45 days of the first credit check. Even if a lender needs to check your credit after the 45-day window is over, shopping around is usually still worth it. The effect of an additional inquiry is small, while shopping around for the best deal can save you a lot of money in the long run.


Why do some mortgage lenders require a certain credit score whereas other mortgage lenders may not?



One Word Mortgage Overlays. Some lenders will institute a higher credit score than the minimum below to lessen their risk of having to buy the loan back from the government agencies if they get too many mortgage defaults. In order to protect their lending portfolio and hedging their risk, they will require say a 640 credit score or higher for a FHA loan, whereas the guidelines clearly state you can do a FHA loan with a minimum credit score of 580 To understand mortgage overlays, it helps to have a foundation of how the mortgage approval process works. Mortgage lenders always have underwriting guidelines—standards to determine the amount and terms you qualify for.

Credit Score Minimum guidelines are typically set based on the mortgage program, e.g., FHA, VA, or USDA. FHA, --

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How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances




What score does the Mortgage Lender Use? Why may it be different than the one you are seeing?




The reason mortgage lenders use older FICO Scores is because they don’t have a choice. They are essentially forced to use them.

For a bank to sell a mortgage to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, FHA VA, USDA, Etc, the loan has to meet certain guidelines. Some of these guidelines require borrowers to have a minimum credit score under specific FICO Score generations.

If you’re planning to apply for a mortgage, be aware that the credit score you see on your application might differ slightly from the one you’re used to.

It might even be different than what comes up when you monitor your credit, or even when you apply for a car loan.

Banks use a slightly different credit score model when evaluating mortgage applicants. Below, we go over what you need to know about credit scores you’re looking to buy a home.

The scoring model used in mortgage applications

While the FICO® 8 model is the most widely used scoring model for general lending decisions, banks use the following FICO scores when you apply for a mortgage:

FICO® Score 2 (Experian)
FICO® Score 5 (Equifax)
FICO® Score 4 (TransUnion)

As you can see, each of the three main credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) use a slightly different version of the industry-specific FICO Score. That’s because FICO tweaks and tailors its scoring model to best predict the creditworthiness for different industries and bureaus. You’re still evaluated on the same core factors (payment history, credit use, credit mix and age of your accounts), but the categories are weighed a little bit differently.

The FICO 8 model is known for being more critical of high balances on revolving credit lines. Since revolving credit is less of a factor when it comes to mortgages, the FICO 2, 4 and 5 models, which put less emphasis on credit utilization, have proven to be reliable when evaluating good candidates for a mortgage.

Mortgage lenders pull all three reports, from all three bureaus, but they only use one when making their final decision.

“A bank will use all three bureaus,”--- “It’s called a tri-merge.”

If all three of your scores are the same, then their choice is simple. But what if your scores are different?

And if you are applying for a mortgage with another person, such as your spouse or partner, each applicant’s FICO 2, 4 and 5 scores are pulled. The bank identifies the median score for both parties, then uses the lowest of the final two.


How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances



How do you increase your score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan


By paying down your credit card balances (credit utilization) and having a good pay history (payment history) ,this is the best way to raise your score. 


 The credit bureaus don't update immediately, so I would not add to the balance or open any new bills or have any other lender do an inquiry on your credit report while we wait for the scores to hopefully go up in the next 30 days. Try to keep everything status quo and make your payments on time and keep your balances low or lower than what is now reporting on the credit report. 

How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances

How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances







How to improve your credit score!

Pay Every Single Bill on Time, or Early, Every Month

Please understand one thing; paying your bills on time each month is the single most important thing you can do to increase your credit scores.

Depending on the credit bureau, there are 4 or 5 main items that determine everyone’s credit score. Of those items, your history of paying bills makes up about 35% of the score. THIS IS HUGE!

Paying your bills on time shows lenders that you are responsible. It will also spare you from paying late fees whether it is a charge from a credit card or an added fee from your landlord.

Use a calendar, or a phone app, or some other organized system to make sure that you pay your bills on time every single month.

MAIN TIP: Do not pay ANY bill late!

Credit Cards: Lower Balances Are Always Better 

Another big factor in calculating a credit score is the amount of credit card debt. Credit bureaus look at two things when analyzing your credit cards.

First, they look at your available credit limit. Second, they look at the existing balance on each card. From these two figures an available ratio is developed. As the ratio goes higher, so too will your credit score increase.

Here is one simple example. Suppose a person has the following credit cards, corresponding balances, and credit limits

Credit CardCurrent BalanceCredit Limit
Chase Visa$105$1,000
Mastercard from local bank$236$1,500
BP MasterCard$87$500
Totals$428$3,000

From these numbers, we get the following calculation

$428/$3,000 = 14%

In other words, the person is using 14% of their available credit and they have 86% available credit. The closer that ratio is to 100%, the better the credit score will be.


MAIN TIP:
 Keep all credit card balances as low as possible.In this particular example, if they had a problem with their car, or needed medical attention or some other emergency, the person would have the money necessary to handle the situation without incurring new debt. This is wise on the consumer’s part and lenders like to see this kind of money management.

Credit Cards Part 2: 1 or 2 is Better Than a Wallet Full

The previous example showed a person that utilized just three credit cards. This is much better than someone who has 5+ credit cards, all with available balances. Why? Lenders do not like to see someone that has the potential to get too far in debt in a short amount of time.

Some people have 5, 10 or more credit cards and they use many of them. This shows a lack of restraint and control. It is much better, and neater, to have only 2 or 3 cards with low rates that handle all of your transactions. A lower number of cards are easier to manage and it does not give a person the temptation to go on a huge shopping spree that could take years to payoff.

MAIN TIP: Try to limit yourself to no more than 2-3 credit cards.


Keep the Good Stuff Right Where it is

Too many people make the mistake of paying off old debts, such as old credit cards, and then closing the account. This is actually a bad idea.

A small part of the credit score is based on the length of time a person has had credit. If you have a couple of credit cards with a long track history of making payments on time and keeping the balance at a manageable level, it is a bad idea to close out the card.

Similarly, if you have been paying on a car or motorcycle for a long time, do not be in a hurry to pay off the balance. Continue to make the payments like clockwork each month.

An account that has a good record will help your scores. An account that has a good record and multiple years of use will have an even better impact on your score.

MAIN TIP: Keep old accounts open if you have a good payment history with them.

Stop Filling Out Credit Applications


Multiple credit inquiries in a short amount of time can really hurt your credit scores. Lenders view the various inquiries as someone that is desperate and possibly on the verge of making a bad financial choice.Too many people make the mistake of getting more credit after they are approved for a loan. For example, if someone is approved for a new credit card, they feel good about their finances and decide to apply for credit with a local furniture store. If they get approved for the new furniture, they may decide to upgrade their car. This requires yet another loan. They are surprised to learn that their credit score has dropped and the interest rate on the new car loan will be much higher. What happened?

If you currently have 2 or 3 credit cards along with either a car loan or a student loan, don’t apply for any more debt. Make sure the payments on your current debt are all up to date and focus on paying them all down.

In a few months of making timely payments your scores should noticeably go up.

MAIN TIP: Limit your new loans as much as possible





Joel Lobb  Mortgage Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call: 502-905-3708
fax: 502-327-9119
email:
 kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/



How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances



NMLS 57916  | Company NMLS #1364/MB73346135166/MBR1574


The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approvalnor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).


 


Kentucky Mortgage Approval Underwriting Myths Debunked for FHA, VA, USDA and Fannie Mae

 Mortgage Approval Underwriting Myths Debunked


Getting approved for a loan is not as hard as some make it. The 3C approach breaks it down in its simplest form so no need to overthink or complicate with “what if’s” or variable situations and these factors are the same in every state. They all have to line up for your loan to be approved but here there are in order of significance

Capacity - No matter if your credit is in 800’s the ability to afford a loan (capacity aka DTI) is the MOST important C and why most applications either get denied or reduced. Income is EVERYTHING.

To get a conforming (FHA / VA / Conventional) loan you need 2yrs of verifiable Full time income even if it’s pieced together with different employers with 2yrs W2’s and your most recent paystub if you’re an employee and OT and/or bonus cannot be used if you’ve been with your employer for less than 2yrs.

If you have part time employment as well that income cannot be used unless you’ve worked both jobs for at least 2yrs UNLESS your P/T job is the exact same as your F/T job and your hours are not variable then in most cases you can get an exception if you’ve been there for at least 1yr. If you’re self employed 2 most recent tax returns with positive income on line 31 of your schedule C.

If homeownership is your goal, then don’t be cheap and have a certified tax preparer prepare your taxes because it’s likely you’ll need certain docs to get approved only they can provide. Also DO NOT write off all your income to avoid paying the IRS taxes because this will disqualify you from a loan and you’ll have to get a more expensive loan with a bigger down payment.


Credit - many people think this is the most important but it’s not but it is important. With a high enough capacity (low DTI) I’ve seen clients with minimum scores get approved. FHA requires 580, VA does not have a minimum score requirement and while some lenders can do down in the 500’s generally most lenders do not go below 580, and conventional requires 620.

Having said all that just because you meet the minimum score does not mean you’ll get an approval before credit profile (positive tradeline history, collection activity, credit usage) is what matters most. I’ve seen applicants with 680+ get denied for conventional loans because they have a poor credit profile or low capacity (higher DTI).

FHA is a little more forgiving which is why they are easier loans to get than conventional. Obviously the higher the score, the better the chances are for approval but high scores aren’t needed if capacity and collateral are strong.

Collateral - aka down payment. Underwriters request either 1 bank statement for FHA or 2 bank statements for conventional and all they are looking for is verification of cash to close, large deposit (FHA more than 1% of loan amount deposited in 1 deposit) activity and reserves if needed, not spending habits. Large purchases are irrelevant and NSF’s can be explained with an explanation letter. The higher the down payment in percentages (3.5 or 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% etc…) not dollars ($2000 or $5000 more than required) then the lower the risk and higher chance of approval especially for conventional loans. Plus dollars don’t noticeably reduce your monthly payment but percentages do.

Overlays - additional restrictions some lenders have in addition to standard mortgage guidelines. If your lender is telling you anything more is required than what’s posted above it’s because they have overlays which make it more difficult to get approved with them.
Example - Veteran’s United will not take credit scores under 620 = OVERLAY



If you want a personalized answer for your unique situation call, text, or email me or visit my website below:




Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916


American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364



Text/call: 502-905-3708

email: kentuckyloan@gmail.com

https://kentuckyloan.blogspot.com/

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This message is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, Title 18, United States Code, §§ 2510-2521. This e-mail and any attached files are deemed privileged and confidential, and are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom this e-mail is addressed. If you are not one of the named recipient(s) or believe that you have received this message in error, please delete this e-mail and any attached files from all locations in your computer, server, network, etc., and notify the sender IMMEDIATELY at 502-327-9770. Any other use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding, or copying of this e-mail and any attached files is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Receipt by anyone other than the named recipient(s) is not a waiver of any attorney-client, work product, or other applicable privilege. E-mail is an informal method of communication and is subject to possible data corruption, either accidentally or intentionally. Therefore, it is normally inappropriate to rely on legal advice contained in an e-mail without obtaining further confirmation of said advice.





Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use.

Great information to share with your clients that uses Credit Karma. A lot of people do not know that the Credit Karma app is a Vantage Score.

Credit Karma is NOT Free!
Credit Karma makes money off of the personal information you volunteered!
Credit Karma is NOT a credit monitoring site! - They collect your information from the credit agencies to create targeted campaigns based on your personal information which makes Credit Karma an affiliate marketing site!
Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use.
Credit Karma provides you with Vantage scores (Not heavily used by lenders)
Credit Karma buys your information for pennies on the dollar, this is how they are able to provide you with updates every 7 days.
Why?... To get you to look at your scores and their AFFILIATE offers! You know, the offers for those credit cards that say you have a fair, good or very good chance of being approved for....
Have you noticed they never say, "You have a bad or poor chance”?
Apply, get denied and now you have an inquiry on your credit profile.
For those of you that are seeing you have a "chance" of getting approved for an American Express ๐Ÿ’ณ think again... You would be surprised to know, American Express only pulls from Experian for credit cards?
Credit Karma DOES NOT give you Experian credit report or scores

While it’s common knowledge that mortgage lenders use FICO scores, most people with a credit history have three FICO scores, one from each of the three national credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion). 


Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use. Which FICO Score is Used for Mortgages?



  • Which FICO Score is Used for Mortgages?

Most lenders determine a borrower’s creditworthiness based on FICO® scores, a Credit Score developed by Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO™). This score tells the lender what type of credit risk you are and what your interest rate should be to reflect that risk. FICO scores have different names at each of the three major United States credit reporting companies. And there are different versions of the FICO formula. Here are the specific versions of the FICO formula used by mortgage lenders:

  • Equifax Beacon 5.0
  • Experian/Fair Isaac Risk Model v2
  • TransUnion FICO Risk Score 04

Lenders have identified a strong correlation between Mortgage performance and FICO Bureau scores (FICO score). FICO scores range from 300 to 850. The lower the FICO score, the greater the risk of default.

Which Score Gets Used?

Since most people have three FICO scores, one from each credit bureau, how do lenders choose which one to use?

For a FICO score to be considered “usable”, it must be based on adequate, concrete information. If there is too little information, or if the information is inaccurate, the FICO score may be deemed unusable for the mortgage underwriting process. Once the underwriter has determined if a score is usable or not, here’s how they decide which score(s) to use for an individual borrower:

  • If all three scores are different, they use the middle score
  • If two of the scores are the same, they use that score, regardless of whether the two repeated scores are higher or lower than the third score

Lenders have identified a strong correlation between Mortgage performance and FICO Bureau scores (FICO score). FICO scores range from 300 to 850. The lower the FICO score, the greater the risk of default.

If it helps to visualize this information:

Identifying the Underwriting Score
ExampleScore 1Score 2Score 3Underwriting Score
Borrower 1680700720700
     

Joel Lobb

Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916

 

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

10602 Timberwood Circle 

Louisville, KY 40223

Company NMLS ID #1364

click here for directions to our office

 

Text/call:      502-905-3708

fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com

 

https://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/

 

 
 

 

 
 
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 

text or call my phone: (502) 905-3708
email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com

The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people. NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). USDA Mortgage loans only offered in Kentucky.

All loans and lines are subject to credit approval, verification, and collateral evaluation