Credit Scores Needed for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan











5 popular programs that Kentucky Home buyers use to purchase their first home.

  Mortgage Rates Kentucky
• At least 3%-5% down
 Closing costs will vary on which rate you choose and the lender. Typically the higher the rate, the lesser closing costs due to the lender giving you a lender credit back at closing for over par pricing. Also, called a no-closing costs option. You have to weigh the pros and cons to see if it makes sense to forgo the lower rate and lower monthly payment for the higher rate and less closing costs.
Fico scores needed start at 620, but most conventional lenders will want a higher score to qualify for the 3-5% minimum down payment requirements Most buyers using this loan have high credit scores (over 720) and at least 5% down.
The rates are a little higher compared to FHA, VA, or USDA loan but the mortgage insurance is not for life of loan and can be rolled off when you reach 80% equity position in home.
Conventional loans require 4-7 years removed from Bankruptcy and foreclosure.
Max Conventional loan limits are set at $424,00 for 2017 in Kentucky


If you meet income eligibility requirements and are looking to settle in a rural area, you might qualify for the KY USDA Rural Housing program. The program guarantees qualifying loans, reducing lenders’ risk and encouraging them to offer buyers 100% loans. That means Kentucky home buyers don’t have to put any money down, and even the “upfront fee” (a closing cost for this type of loan) can be rolled into the financing.
Fico scores usually wanted for this program center around 620 range, with most lenders wanting a 640 score so they can obtain an automated approval through GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting system, and it will dictate your max loan pre-approval based on your income, credit scores, debt to income ratio and assets.
They also allow for a manual underwrite, which states that the max house payment ratios are set at 29% and 41% respectively of your income.
They loan requires no down payment, and the current mortgage insurance is 1% upfront, called a funding fee, and .35% annually for the monthly mi payment. Since they recently reduced their mi requirements, USDA is one of the best options out there for home buyers looking to buy in an rural area.
A rural area typically will be any area outside the major cities of Louisville, Lexington, Paducah, Bowling Green, Richmond, Frankfort, and parts of Northern  Kentucky .
There is a map link below to see the qualifying areas.
There is also a max household income limits with most cutoff starting at $76,000 for a family of four, and up to $98,000 for a family of five or more.
USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy and foreclosure.
There is no max USDA loan limit.


FHA loans are good for home buyers with lower credit scores and no much down, or with down payment assistance grants. FHA will allow for grants, gifts, for their 3.5% minimum investment and will go down to a 580 credit score.
The current mortgage insurance requirements are kinda steep when compared to USDA, VA , but the rates are usually good so it can counteracts the high mi premiums. As I tell borrowers, you will not have the loan for 30 years, so don’t worry too much about the mi premiums.
THe mi premiums are for life of loan like USDA.
FHA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and 3 years removed from foreclosure.
Maximum FHA loan limits in Kentucky are set around $285,000 and below.


VA loans are for veterans and active duty military personnel. The loan requires no down payment and no monthly mi premiums, saving you on the monthly payment. It does have an funding fee like USDA, but it is higher starting at 2% for first time use, and 3% for second time use. The funding fee is financed into the loan, so it is not something you have to pay upfront outof pocket.
VA loans can be made anywhere, unlike the USDA restrictions, and there is no income household limit and the max loan is $417,000 in Kentucky
Most VA lenders I work with will want a 580 credit score.
VA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy or foreclosure.


This type of loan is administered  by KHC in the state of Kentucky. They typically have $4500 to $6000 down payment assistance year around, that is in the form of a second mortgage that you pay back over 10 years.
Sometimes they will come to market with other down payment assistance and lower market rates to benefit lower income households with not a lot of money for down payment.
KHC offers FHA, VA, USDA, and Conventional loans with their minimum credit scores being set at 620 for all programs. The conventional loan requirements at KHC requires 660 credit score.
The max debt to income ratios are set at 40% an 45% respectively.



∘ What kind of credit score do I need to qualify for different first time home buyer loans in Kentucky?
Answer.


Most lenders will wants a middle credit score of 620 for KY First Time Home Buyers looking to go no money down. The two most used no money down home loans in Kentucky being USDA Rural Housing and KHC with their down payment assistance will want a 620 middle score on their programs.
If you have access to 3.5% down payment, you can go FHA and secure a 30 year fixed rate mortgage with some lenders with a 580 credit score. Even though FHA on paper says they will go down to 500 credit score with at least 10% down payment, you will find it hard to get the loan approved because lenders will create overlays to protect their interest and maintain a good standing with FHA and HUD.
Another popular no money down loan is VA. Most VA lenders will want a 620 middle credit score but like FHA, VA on paper says they will go down to a 500 score, but good luck finding a lender for that scenario.
A lot of times if your scores are in the high 500’s or low 600’s range, we can do a rapid rescore and get your scores improved within 30 days.

 Does it costs anything to get pre-approved for a mortgage loan?


Answer:

Most lenders will not charge you a fee to get pre-approved, but some lenders may want you to pay for the credit report fee upfront. Typically costs for a tri-merge credit report for a single borrower runs about $50 or less. Maybe higher if more borrowers are included on the loan application.


∘ How long does it take to get approved for a mortgage loan in Kentucky?

Answer:
Typically if you have all your income and asset documents together and submit to the lender, they typically can get you a pre-approval through the Automated Underwriting Systems within 24 hours. They will review credit, income and assets and run it through the different AUS (Automated Underwriting Systems) for the template for your loan pre-approval. Fannie Mae uses DU, or Desktop Underwriting, FHA and VA also use DU, and USDA uses a automated system called GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting System.
If you get an Automated Approval, loan officers will use this for your pre-approval. If you have a bad credit history, high debt to income ratios,  or lack of down payment,  the AUS will sometimes refer the loan to a manual underwrite, which could result in a longer turn time for your loan pre-approval answer


 Are there any special programs in Kentucky that help with down payment or no money down loans for KY First Time Home Buyers?
Answer:

There are some programs available to KY First Time Home Buyers that offer zero down financing: KHC, USDA, VA, Fannie Mae Home Possible and HomePath, HUD $100 down and City Grants are all available to Kentucky First Time Home buyers if you qualify for them. Ask your loan officer about these programs

∘ When can I lock in my interest rate to protect it from going up when I buy my first home?
Answer:

You typically can lock in your mortgage rate and protect it from going up once you have a home picked-out and under contract. You can usually lock in your mortgage rate for free for 90 days, and if you need more time, you can extend the lock in rate for a fee to the lender in case the home buying process is taking a longer time. The longer the term you lock the rate in the future, the higher the costs because the lender is taking a risk on rates in the future.
Interest rates are kinda like gas prices, they change daily, and the general trend is that they have been going up since the Presidential election in November 2016.

∘ How much money do I need to pay to close the loan?
Answer:

Depending on which loan program you choose, the outlay to close the loan can vary. Typically you will need to budget for the following to buy a home: Good faith deposit, usually less than $500 which holds the home for you while you close the loan. You get this back at closing; Appraisal fee is required to be paid to lender before closing. Typical costs run around $400-$450 for an appraisal fee; home inspection fees. Even though the lender’s programs don’t require a home inspection, a lot of buyers do get one done. The costs for a home inspection runs around $300-$400. Lastly, termite report. They are very cheap, usually $50 or less, and VA requires one on their loan programs. FHA, KHC, USDAS, Fannie Mae does not require a termite report, but most borrowers get one done.
There are also lender costs for title insurance, title exam, closing fee, and underwriting fees that will be incurred at closing too. You can negotiated the seller to pay for these fees in the contract, or sometimes the lender can pay for this with a lender credit.
The lender has to issue a breakdown of the fees you will incur on your loan pre-approval.


How long is my pre-approval good for on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?
Answer:

Most lenders will honor your loan pre-approval for 60 days. After that, they will have to re-run your credit report and ask for updated pay stubs, bank statements, to make sure your credit quality and income and assets has not changed from the initial loan pre-approval.

How much money do I have to make to qualify for a mortgage loan in Kentucky?

Answer:


The general rule for most FHA, VA, KHC, USDA and Fannie MAe loans is that we run your loan application through the Automated Underwriting systems, and it will tell us your max loan qualifying ratios.
There are two ratios that matter when you qualify for a mortgage loan. The front-end ratio, is the new house payment divided by your gross monthly income.  The back-end ratio, is the new house payment added to your current monthly bills on the credit report, to include child support obligations and 401k loans.
Car insurance, cell phone bills, utilities bills does not factor into your qualifying rations.
If the loan gets a refer on the initial desktop underwriting findings, then most programs will default to a front end ratio of 31% and a back-end ratio of 43% for most government agency loans that get a refer. You then take the lowest payment to qualify based on the front-end and back-end ratio.
So for example, let’s say you make $3000 a month and you have $400 in monthly bills you pay on the credit report. What would be your maximum qualifying house payment for a new loan?
Take the $3000 x .43%= $1290 maximum back-end ratio house payment. So take the $1290-$400= $890 max house payment you qualify for on the back-end ratio.
Then take the $3000 x .31%=$930 maximum qualifying house payment on front-end ratio.
So now your know! The max house payment you would qualify would be the $890, because it is the lowest payment of the two ratios.


21933-applyonlinenow-ani

When it comes to mortgages and credit scores, there are two really important questions to ask:

–What credit score do I need to qualify for a mortgage?

–What credit score do I need to get the lowest interest rate on a mortgage?

These different but related questions are important if you are looking to buy a home. And the second question is particularly important. With a high FICO score, you can literally save tens of thousands of dollars in interest over the life of a home loan. So let’s take a look at both questions. And if you don’t know you score, be sure to get you free credit score.

What credit score do you need to qualify for a mortgage?

The first thing to keep in mind is that qualifying for a mortgage involves a lot more than just a credit score. While your FICO score is a very important ingredient, it is just one factor. Lenders also look at your income and level of debt, among other things.

As a rule of thumb, however, a credit score below 640 will make buying a home very difficult. A FICO score below 640 is considered sub-prime. In the past there were mortgage companies that specialized in sub-prime mortgages. Because of the challenges in the credit market over the last year or so, however, sub-prime loans have become difficult if not impossible to obtain.

A FICO score between 620 and 650 is considered fair to good credit. But keep in mind, this range of credit scores does not guarantee you will qualify for a mortgage, and if you do qualify, it won’t get you the lowest interest rate possible. Still, to buy a home aim for a score of at least 640, recognizing that other factors weigh in the decision and that some banks may require a higher score.

What credit score do you need to get a low rate mortgage?

It use to be that a score of about 720 would yield the lowest mortgage rates available. Today, the best rates kick in with a FICO score of 760. And interest rates go up significantly as your credit score drops. To give you an idea, the following table shows current rates by credit score and calculates a monthly principal and interest payment based on a $300,000 loan:

FICO Score; 30-year Fixed Rate Mortgage


FICO Score APR Monthly Payment


760-850 4.643% $1,546


700-759 4.865% $1,586


680-699 5.042% $1,618


660-679 5.256% $1,658


640-659 5.686% $1,739


620-639 6.232% $1,844

Of course, the interest rates change daily, but the above table gives you an idea of the importance of a high score when you apply for a mortgage













































In today's tight economy, more than 25 percent of consumers -- an estimated 43.4 million people -- have a credit score of 599 or below, according to recent numbers released by FICO. "And while the FHA program will write mortgages with the same great interest rates all the way down to a credit score of 580, other low-rate offers will generally require a score of 720 or higher," said Keith Gumbinger, Vice President of HSH.com.


Excellent Good Fair Poor



You'll be offered better mortgage rates with a higher credit score, says Gumbinger, and that translates into savings. Get offered a 6 percent rate instead of 5 percent on a $200,000, 30-year mortgage, and you'll wind up paying about $125 more each month.



Here's what you can do to raise your credit scores and get on the path to home ownership.



Know how your score works



Your overall credit score is made up of several factors, and each is weighted differently. Since different credit behaviors can have different effects on your score, it's important to know how they works.



Here's the breakdown of which factors affect your credit score:






•Payment history (35 percent)


•Amounts owed (30 percent)


•Length of credit history (15 percent)


•New credit (10 percent)


•Types of credit used (10 percent)

Get credit savvy



Think about how your financial behavior affects your credit score. Do you carry a balance on your credit cards? If so, that hurts your score in terms of amounts owed. If you open too many new lines of credit, mortgage lenders will see you as desperate. Making late payments causes creditors to think you're insolvent. These are all things that will drop your credit score.



Check your status



"You'll want to review your credit reports six months or more before a large credit event like applying for a mortgage," says Gumbinger. It can take quite some time to clear up any errors or solve legitimate disputes, and you want those things off your report when you fill out mortgage applications.



Even if you're not in the market for a mortgage, you'll still want to review your credit reports at least once each year. You're entitled to one free credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) each year. Stagger receiving the reports, and you'll have a credit update once every four months. You can access your free reports at www.annualcreditreport.com.



Pay on time



"Be extra careful to make each [of] your minimum payments on time each month," says Barry Paperno, product support manager for FICO, inventor of the FICO score. "If you're late making payments now, bring them current immediately and keep them current." Your payment history makes up the largest part of your credit score (35 percent), and it takes longer to raise your score after late payments than it does for some other issues.



Pay down debt



Since the FICO formula looks at your credit card limits and balances, both individually and in total, shifting balances around won't make your bottom line look any better. Instead, you'll want to pay down balances while continuing to use the cards, says Paperno. Ideally, you'll want to aim for a utilization percentage, both individually and in total, of under 10 percent. That means you're using less than 10 percent of available credit on any one of your cards.



Don't close accounts



Length of credit history is another important part of your credit score, so closing old accounts could actually hurt you. That's because potential mortgage lenders want to know you've been responsible with credit for a good long time. Keep older accounts active by making small charges on each one at least every few months and then paying those charges off right away, advises Paperno. "Using your cards regularly keeps them active, which ensures that your credit limits on these cards continue to be open and included in your credit utilization. Contrary to popular belief, you won't be penalized for having lots of available credit.




Resources

Having a good understanding of credit scores can help as you manage your finances. The good news is that in addition to a printer-friendly version of the quiz you just took, many resources are available online that provide valuable information. Download the print version of the quiz and visit the sites below to increase your knowledge about credit reports and credit scores.
To download a printer-friendly PDF version of CreditScoreQuiz.org, click here.
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CFA and VantageScore
Credit Reporting Companies
The three major national credit reporting companies (CRCs) are: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. These firms collect information about your borrowing and repayment behavior from lenders and businesses that have extended credit to you. This information is compiled into a credit report. You can obtain a copy of your credit report from each of the three companies for a fee. You are also entitled to a free copy within 60 days of being denied credit from the CRC that supplied the lender with your report.
You may contact each company by clicking their name: 
Free Credit Report Once a Year
Consumers can obtain a free copy of their credit reports once a year from each of the three national credit reporting companies at annualcreditreport.com or by calling 1-877-322-8228.
Government
Several organizations within the federal government make information available about credit reports and credit scores, including the following:

Your credit history is important to a lot of people: mortgage lenders, banks, utility companies, prospective employers, and more. So it's especially important that you understand your credit report, credit score, and the companies that compile that information, credit bureaus. This site--maintained by the Federal Reserve Board--provides answers to some of the most common, and most important, questions about credit.

Your Credit Report

Q: What is a credit report?

A: A credit report is a record of your credit history that includes information about:
  • Your identity. Your name, address, full or partial Social Security number, date of birth, and possibly employment information.
  • Your existing credit. Information about credit that you have, such as your credit card accounts, mortgages, car loans, and student loans. It may also include the terms of your credit, how much you owe your creditors, and your history of making payments.
  • Your public record. Information about any court judgments against you, any tax liens against your property, or whether you have filed for bankruptcy.
  • Inquiries about you. A list of companies or persons who recently requested a copy of your report.

Q: Why is a credit report important?

A: Your credit report is important because lenders, insurers, employers, and others may obtain your credit report from credit bureaus to assess how you manage financial responsibilities. For example:
  • Lenders may use your credit report information to decide whether you can get a loan and the terms you get for a loan (for example, the interest rate they will charge you).
  • Insurance companies may use the information to decide whether you can get insurance and to set the rates you will pay.
  • Employers may use your credit report, if you give them permission to do so, to decide whether to hire you.
  • Telephone and utility companies may use information in your credit report to decide whether to provide services to you.
  • Landlords may use the information to determine whether to rent an apartment to you.

Q: Who collects and reports credit information about me?

A: There are three major credit bureaus--Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion--that gather and maintain the information about you that is included in your credit report. The credit bureaus then provide this information in the form of a credit report to companies or persons that request it, such as lenders from whom you are seeking credit.

Q: Where do credit bureaus get their information?

A: Credit bureaus get information from your creditors, such as a bank, credit card issuer, or auto finance company. They also get information about you from public records, such as property or court records. Each credit bureau gets its information from different sources, so the information in one credit bureau's report may not be the same as the information in another credit bureau's report.

Q: How can I get a free copy of my credit report?

A: You can get one free credit report every twelve months from each of the nationwide credit bureaus--Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion--by
You will need to provide certain information to access your report, such as your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth.
You can order one, two, or all three reports at the same time, or you can request these reports at various times throughout the year. The option you choose will depend on the goal of your review. A report generated by one of the three major credit bureaus may not contain all of the information pertaining to your credit history. Therefore, if you want a complete view of your credit record at a particular moment, you should examine your report from each bureau at the same time. However, if you wish to detect any errors and monitor changes in your credit profile over time, you may wish to review a single credit report every four months.

Q: Who else is allowed to see my credit report?

A: Because credit reports contain sensitive personal information, access to them is limited. Credit bureaus can provide credit reports only to
  • lenders from whom you are seeking credit;
  • lenders that have granted you credit;
  • telephone, cell phone, and utility companies that may provide services to you;
  • your employer or prospective employer, but only if you agree;
  • insurance companies that have issued or may issue an insurance policy for you;
  • government agencies reviewing your financial status for government benefits; and
  • anyone else with a legitimate business need for the information, such as a potential landlord or a bank at which you are opening a checking account.
Credit bureaus also furnish reports if required by court orders or federal grand jury subpoenas. Upon your written request, they will also issue your report to a third party.

Q: Does the credit bureau decide whether to grant me credit?

A: No, credit bureaus do not make credit decisions. They provide credit reports to lenders who decide whether to grant you credit.

Q: How long does negative information, such as late payments, stay on my credit report?

A: Generally, negative credit information stays on your credit report for seven years. If you have filed for personal bankruptcy, that fact stays on your report for ten years. Information about a lawsuit or an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, whichever is longer. Information about criminal convictions may stay on your credit report indefinitely.

Q: What can I do if I am denied credit, insurance, or employment because of something in my credit report? What can I do if I receive less favorable credit terms than other consumers because of something in my credit report?

A: If you are denied credit, insurance, or employment--or some other adverse action is taken against you, such as lowering your credit limit on credit card account--because of information in your credit report, the lender, insurance company, or employer must notify you and provide you with the name, address, and phone number of the credit bureau that provided the credit report used to make the decision. You can get a free credit report from this credit bureau if you request it within sixty days after receiving the notice. This free report is in addition to your annual free report.
In addition, lenders may use a credit report to set the terms of credit they offer you. If a lender offers you terms less favorable (for example, a higher rate) than the terms offered to consumers with better credit histories based on the information in your credit report, the lender may give you a notice with information about the credit bureau that provided the credit report used to make the decision. Again, you can get a free credit report (in addition to your annual free report) from this credit bureau if you request it within sixty days after receiving the notice.
If you receive one of these notices, it's a good idea to get your free credit report and review the information in it right away. If you think your credit report contains inaccurate or incomplete information, follow the steps in Credit Report Errors below, to try to resolve the issue. For tips on how to improve your chances of being granted credit, or to improve your chances of receiving credit on better terms, read the Federal Reserve's 5 Tips: Improving Your Credit Score.

Q: I've been receiving unsolicited credit offers. Why? Can I opt-out of receiving these offers?

A: Credit bureaus may sell the names and addresses of consumers who meet specific credit criteria to creditors or insurers, who must then offer them credit or insurance. For example, a creditor could request from a credit bureau the names and addresses of consumers who have a credit score of 680 or higher and then offer credit to those consumers.
You can have your name and address removed from these lists by opting-out of the listing. This will reduce the number of unsolicited offers you receive. To opt-out, call 888-5-OPTOUT (888-567-8688) or visit www.optoutprescreen.com Leaving the Board. You will need to provide certain information in order to opt-out, such as your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth.
You have the ability to opt-out of receiving offers either for five years or permanently. If you want to opt-out permanently, you will need to fill-out, sign, and mail-in a form. The form is available by either calling the toll-free number or visiting the website.
You can reverse your opt-out decision at any time to start receiving offers of credit and insurance again by calling the toll-free phone number or visiting the website.

Your Credit Score

Q: What is a credit score? How is my credit score calculated?

A: A credit score is a number that reflects the information in your credit report. The score summarizes your credit history and helps lenders predict how likely it is that you will repay a loan and make payments when they are due. Lenders may use credit scores in deciding whether to grant you credit, what terms you are offered, or the rate you will pay on a loan.
Information used to calculate your credit score can include:
  • the number and type of accounts you have (credit cards, auto loans, mortgages, etc.);
  • whether you pay your bills on time;
  • how much of your available credit you are currently using;
  • whether you have any collection actions against you;
  • the amount of your outstanding debt; and
  • the age of your accounts.

Q: What can cause my credit score to change?

A: Because your credit score reflects the information in your credit report, changes to your credit report may cause your credit score to change. For instance, if you pay your bills late or incur more debt, your credit score may go down. However, if you pay down an outstanding balance on a credit card or mortgage or correct an error in your credit report, your credit score may go up.

Q: How can I get my credit score?

A: In some cases, a lender may tell you your credit score for free when you apply for credit. For example, if you apply for a mortgage, you will receive the credit score or scores that were used to determine whether the lender would extend credit to you and on what terms. You may also receive a free credit score or scores from lenders when you apply for other types of credit, such as an automobile loan or a credit card.
You may also purchase your credit score from any of the credit bureaus by calling them or visiting their websites.

Q: How can I improve my credit score?

A: To find out steps you can take to improve your credit score, read the Federal Reserve's 5 Tips: Improving Your Credit Score.

Credit Report Errors

Q: How can I correct errors found in my credit report?

A: If you find errors in your credit report, you may dispute the information and request that the information be deleted or corrected. To do so, you should contact either the credit bureau that provided the report or the company or person that provided the incorrect information to the credit bureau.
To contact the credit bureau, call the toll-free number on your credit report or visit their website:
To contact the company or person that provided the incorrect information to the credit bureau, look on your credit report, in an account statement, or on the company's website for contact information for handling such disputes.
When disputing information on your credit report, you should:
  • Provide information about yourself, such as your name, address, date of birth, and Social Security number;
  • Identify specific details about the information that is being disputed and explain the basis of your dispute;
  • Have a copy of your credit report that contains the disputed information available; and
  • Provide supporting documentation, such as a copy of the relevant portion of the consumer report, a police report, a fraud or identity theft affidavit, or account statements.

Q: What happens once I send in information to correct information in my credit report?

A: If you submit your dispute through a credit bureau or directly to the company or person that provided the incorrect information to the credit bureau, your dispute must be investigated, usually within thirty days. If you provide additional information during the thirty-day investigation, that investigation period may be extended an additional 15 days in some circumstances. When the investigation is completed, either the credit bureau or the company or person that provided the incorrect information to the credit bureau must give you the written results of its investigation.
If the information provider finds the disputed information is inaccurate, it must notify all three nationwide credit bureaus so they can correct the information in your credit report. You can get a free copy of your report if the dispute results in a change. This free report is in addition to your annual free report. If an item is changed or deleted, a credit bureau cannot put the disputed information back in your credit report unless the company or person that provided the incorrect information to the credit bureau verifies that the information is, indeed, accurate and complete.
You can request that the credit bureau send notices of any correction to anyone who received your report in the past six months. A corrected copy of your report can be sent to anyone who received a copy during the past two years for employment purposes.

Q: What if an investigation does not resolve my dispute?

A: If an investigation does not resolve your dispute, you can ask that a statement of the dispute be included in your future credit reports. You also can ask the credit bureau to provide your statement to anyone who received a copy of your report in the recent past, but you may have to pay a fee for this service.
Last Update Date: February 15, 2011
http://www.myfico.com/Downloads/Files/myFICO_UYFS_Booklet.pdf


Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223

 phone: (502) 905-3708
 Fax:     (502) 327-9119

 Company ID #1364 | MB73346


If you have questions about qualifying as first time home buyer in Kentucky, please call, text, email or fill out free prequalification below for your next mortgage loan pre-approval.












The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people