Showing posts with label Fico Score. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fico Score. Show all posts

What goes into your FICO® Scores for A Kentucky Mortgage ?

 

What goes into your Kentucky Mortgage FICO®  Scores ?


The FICO® Score is calculated using 5 categories of data:

  • 35% Payment history: Whether you've paid past credit accounts on time.
  • 30% Amounts owed: The amount of credit and loans you are using.
  • 15% Length of credit history: How long you've had credit.
  • 10% New credit: Your frequency of credit inquiries and new account openings.
  • 10% Credit mix: The mix of your credit cards, retail accounts, installment loans and mortgages.

Your FICO Scores are unique, just like you. They are calculated based on the categories described above, but for some people, the importance of these categories can be different.

What goes into your FICO®  Scores for A Kentucky Mortgage ?


What goes into your FICO®  Scores for A Kentucky Mortgage ?

Joel Lobb  Mortgage Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call: 502-905-3708
fax: 502-327-9119
email:
 kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/


NMLS 57916  | Company NMLS #1364/MB73346135166/MBR1574


The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval
nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).


The Credit Report and Credit Scores Used For A Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval FHA, USDA, Fannie Mae and VA



A lot of buyers are hesitant about having their credit pulled because they think it will go down, whereas in most cases, scores are really the same with most mortgage lenders. Below I will try to explain to you what mortgage lenders use for credit qualifying scores and why you may have a different credit score and why some lenders may require a higher score than other lenders.

Lastly, each lender must pull their own credit report and cannot use another lender's credit report or the consumer's credit report. I will explain the reasoning below. 

Does shopping around for a mortgage hurt my credit?



No. Within a 45-day window, multiple credit checks from mortgage lenders are recorded on your credit report as a single inquiry. This is because other lenders realize that you are only going to buy one home. 

The impact on your credit is the same no matter how many lenders you consult, as long as the last credit check is within 45 days of the first credit check. Even if a lender needs to check your credit after the 45-day window is over, shopping around is usually still worth it. The effect of an additional inquiry is small, while shopping around for the best deal can save you a lot of money in the long run.


Why do some mortgage lenders require a certain credit score whereas other mortgage lenders may not?



One Word Mortgage Overlays. Some lenders will institute a higher credit score than the minimum below to lessen their risk of having to buy the loan back from the government agencies if they get too many mortgage defaults. In order to protect their lending portfolio and hedging their risk, they will require say a 640 credit score or higher for a FHA loan, whereas the guidelines clearly state you can do a FHA loan with a minimum credit score of 580 To understand mortgage overlays, it helps to have a foundation of how the mortgage approval process works. Mortgage lenders always have underwriting guidelines—standards to determine the amount and terms you qualify for.

Credit Score Minimum guidelines are typically set based on the mortgage program, e.g., FHA, VA, or USDA. FHA, --

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How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances




What score does the Mortgage Lender Use? Why may it be different than the one you are seeing?




The reason mortgage lenders use older FICO Scores is because they don’t have a choice. They are essentially forced to use them.

For a bank to sell a mortgage to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, FHA VA, USDA, Etc, the loan has to meet certain guidelines. Some of these guidelines require borrowers to have a minimum credit score under specific FICO Score generations.

If you’re planning to apply for a mortgage, be aware that the credit score you see on your application might differ slightly from the one you’re used to.

It might even be different than what comes up when you monitor your credit, or even when you apply for a car loan.

Banks use a slightly different credit score model when evaluating mortgage applicants. Below, we go over what you need to know about credit scores you’re looking to buy a home.

The scoring model used in mortgage applications

While the FICO® 8 model is the most widely used scoring model for general lending decisions, banks use the following FICO scores when you apply for a mortgage:

FICO® Score 2 (Experian)
FICO® Score 5 (Equifax)
FICO® Score 4 (TransUnion)

As you can see, each of the three main credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) use a slightly different version of the industry-specific FICO Score. That’s because FICO tweaks and tailors its scoring model to best predict the creditworthiness for different industries and bureaus. You’re still evaluated on the same core factors (payment history, credit use, credit mix and age of your accounts), but the categories are weighed a little bit differently.

The FICO 8 model is known for being more critical of high balances on revolving credit lines. Since revolving credit is less of a factor when it comes to mortgages, the FICO 2, 4 and 5 models, which put less emphasis on credit utilization, have proven to be reliable when evaluating good candidates for a mortgage.

Mortgage lenders pull all three reports, from all three bureaus, but they only use one when making their final decision.

“A bank will use all three bureaus,”--- “It’s called a tri-merge.”

If all three of your scores are the same, then their choice is simple. But what if your scores are different?

And if you are applying for a mortgage with another person, such as your spouse or partner, each applicant’s FICO 2, 4 and 5 scores are pulled. The bank identifies the median score for both parties, then uses the lowest of the final two.


How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances



How do you increase your score to qualify for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan


By paying down your credit card balances (credit utilization) and having a good pay history (payment history) ,this is the best way to raise your score. 


 The credit bureaus don't update immediately, so I would not add to the balance or open any new bills or have any other lender do an inquiry on your credit report while we wait for the scores to hopefully go up in the next 30 days. Try to keep everything status quo and make your payments on time and keep your balances low or lower than what is now reporting on the credit report. 

How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances

How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances







How to improve your credit score!

Pay Every Single Bill on Time, or Early, Every Month

Please understand one thing; paying your bills on time each month is the single most important thing you can do to increase your credit scores.

Depending on the credit bureau, there are 4 or 5 main items that determine everyone’s credit score. Of those items, your history of paying bills makes up about 35% of the score. THIS IS HUGE!

Paying your bills on time shows lenders that you are responsible. It will also spare you from paying late fees whether it is a charge from a credit card or an added fee from your landlord.

Use a calendar, or a phone app, or some other organized system to make sure that you pay your bills on time every single month.

MAIN TIP: Do not pay ANY bill late!

Credit Cards: Lower Balances Are Always Better 

Another big factor in calculating a credit score is the amount of credit card debt. Credit bureaus look at two things when analyzing your credit cards.

First, they look at your available credit limit. Second, they look at the existing balance on each card. From these two figures an available ratio is developed. As the ratio goes higher, so too will your credit score increase.

Here is one simple example. Suppose a person has the following credit cards, corresponding balances, and credit limits

Credit CardCurrent BalanceCredit Limit
Chase Visa$105$1,000
Mastercard from local bank$236$1,500
BP MasterCard$87$500
Totals$428$3,000

From these numbers, we get the following calculation

$428/$3,000 = 14%

In other words, the person is using 14% of their available credit and they have 86% available credit. The closer that ratio is to 100%, the better the credit score will be.


MAIN TIP:
 Keep all credit card balances as low as possible.In this particular example, if they had a problem with their car, or needed medical attention or some other emergency, the person would have the money necessary to handle the situation without incurring new debt. This is wise on the consumer’s part and lenders like to see this kind of money management.

Credit Cards Part 2: 1 or 2 is Better Than a Wallet Full

The previous example showed a person that utilized just three credit cards. This is much better than someone who has 5+ credit cards, all with available balances. Why? Lenders do not like to see someone that has the potential to get too far in debt in a short amount of time.

Some people have 5, 10 or more credit cards and they use many of them. This shows a lack of restraint and control. It is much better, and neater, to have only 2 or 3 cards with low rates that handle all of your transactions. A lower number of cards are easier to manage and it does not give a person the temptation to go on a huge shopping spree that could take years to payoff.

MAIN TIP: Try to limit yourself to no more than 2-3 credit cards.


Keep the Good Stuff Right Where it is

Too many people make the mistake of paying off old debts, such as old credit cards, and then closing the account. This is actually a bad idea.

A small part of the credit score is based on the length of time a person has had credit. If you have a couple of credit cards with a long track history of making payments on time and keeping the balance at a manageable level, it is a bad idea to close out the card.

Similarly, if you have been paying on a car or motorcycle for a long time, do not be in a hurry to pay off the balance. Continue to make the payments like clockwork each month.

An account that has a good record will help your scores. An account that has a good record and multiple years of use will have an even better impact on your score.

MAIN TIP: Keep old accounts open if you have a good payment history with them.

Stop Filling Out Credit Applications


Multiple credit inquiries in a short amount of time can really hurt your credit scores. Lenders view the various inquiries as someone that is desperate and possibly on the verge of making a bad financial choice.Too many people make the mistake of getting more credit after they are approved for a loan. For example, if someone is approved for a new credit card, they feel good about their finances and decide to apply for credit with a local furniture store. If they get approved for the new furniture, they may decide to upgrade their car. This requires yet another loan. They are surprised to learn that their credit score has dropped and the interest rate on the new car loan will be much higher. What happened?

If you currently have 2 or 3 credit cards along with either a car loan or a student loan, don’t apply for any more debt. Make sure the payments on your current debt are all up to date and focus on paying them all down.

In a few months of making timely payments your scores should noticeably go up.

MAIN TIP: Limit your new loans as much as possible





Joel Lobb  Mortgage Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call: 502-905-3708
fax: 502-327-9119
email:
 kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/



How Credit Scores Affect your Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Chances



NMLS 57916  | Company NMLS #1364/MB73346135166/MBR1574


The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approvalnor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).


 


Here are action steps you can take right now to buy a home in Kentucky in 2024

 Here are action steps you can take right now to buy a home in Kentucky in 2023


1. Focus on your credit score

FICO credit scores are among the most frequently used credit scores, and range from 350-800 (the higher, the better). A consumer with a credit score of 750 or higher is considered to have excellent credit, while a consumer with a credit score below 620 is considered to have poor credit.

To qualify for a mortgage and get a low mortgage rate, your credit score matters.

Each credit bureau collects information on your credit history and develops a credit score that lenders use to assess your riskiness as a borrower. If you find an error, you should report it to the credit bureau immediately so that it can be corrected.


2. Manage your debt-to-income ratio

Many lenders evaluate your debt-to-income ratio when making credit decisions, which could impact the interest rate you receive.

A debt-to-income ratio is your monthly debt payments as a percentage of your monthly income. Lenders focus on this ratio to determine whether you have enough excess cash to cover your living expenses plus your debt obligations.

Since a debt-to-income ratio has two components (debt and income), the best way to lower your debt-to-income ratio is to:

  • repay existing debt;
  • earn more income; or
  • do both

3. Pay attention to your payments

Simply put, lenders want to lend to financially responsible borrowers.

Your payment history is one of the largest components of your credit score. To ensure on-time payments, set up autopay for all your accounts so the funds are directly debited each month.

FICO scores are weighted more heavily by recent payments so your future matters more than your past.

In particular, make sure to:

  • Pay off the balance if you have a delinquent payment
  • Don't skip any payments
  • Make all payments on time

4. Get pre-approved for a mortgage before you start shopping for a home loan.

Too many people find their home and then get a mortgage.

Switch it.

Get pre-approved with a lender first. Then, you'll know how much home you can afford.

To get pre-approved, lenders will look at your income, assets, credit profile and employment, among other documents.

5. Keep credit utilization low on your credit cards

Lenders also evaluate your credit card utilization, or your monthly credit card spending as a percentage of your credit limit.

Ideally, your credit utilization should be less than 30%. If you can keep it less than 10%, even better.

For example, if you have a $10,000 credit limit on your credit card and spent $3,000 this month, your credit utilization is 30%.

Here are some ways to manage your credit card utilization:

  • set up automatic balance alerts to monitor credit utilization
  • ask your lender to raise your credit limit (this may involve a hard credit pull so check with your lender first)
  • pay off your balance multiple times a month to reduce your credit utilization

6. Look for down payment assistance in Kentucky

There are various types of down payment assistance, even if you have student loans.

Here are a few:

  • FHA loans - federal loan through the Federal Housing Authority
  • USDA loans - zero down mortgages for rural and suburban homeowners
  • VA loans - if military service
  • Kentucky Housing Down Payment Assistance of $10,000

Here are action steps you can take right now to buy a home in Kentucky


There are federal, state and local assistance programs as well so be on the look out.



If you want a personalized answer for your unique situation call, text, or email me or visit my website below:








Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916


American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle 
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364



Text/call:      502-905-3708

email:          kentuckyloan@gmail.com
 

https://kentuckyloan.blogspot.com/

 









--

Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Text/call:      502-905-3708
fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com

 

How to Qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Home Loan

 There’s no universal minimum credit score needed for a mortgage, but a better credit score will give you more options. 

If you’re trying to get a mortgage, your credit score matters. Mortgage lenders use credit scores — as well as other information — to assess your likelihood of repaying a loan on time.

Because credit scores are so important, lenders set minimum scores you must have in order to qualify for a mortgage with them. Minimum credit score varies by lender and mortgage type, but generally, a higher score means better loan terms for you.

Let’s look at which loan types are best for different credit scores.

How to qualify for a mortgage

The type of mortgage you’re applying for determines the minimum requirements you’ll have to meet for your down payment, credit score, and debt-to-income ratio.

Find out what type of loan you might qualify for or what aspects of your finances you’ll need to improve to get a better shot at qualifying for a mortgage.

Loan TypeMin. Down PaymentMin. Credit ScoreMax DTIProperty Type
Conventional3%62045%Primary, secondary, investment
VA0%nonenonePrimary
FHA3.5%50050%Primary
USDA0%none41%Primary

Keep in mind: The minimum down payment, minimum credit score, and maximum DTI shown in the table apply to mortgages used to purchase a primary residence. While you can use a conventional loan or a jumbo loan to purchase a home for another purpose, you might need a larger down payment, a higher credit score, more cash reserves, or all three.

Credit score needed to buy a house

Mortgage lending is risky, and lenders want a way to quantify that risk. They use your three-digit credit score to gauge the risk of loaning you money since your credit score helps predict your likelihood of paying back a loan on time. Lenders also consider other data, such as your income, employment, debts and assets to decide whether to offer you a loan.

Different lenders and loan types have different borrower requirements, loan terms and minimum credit scores. Here are the requirements for some of the most common types of mortgages.

Conventional loan

Minimum credit score: 620

A conventional loan is a mortgage that isn’t backed by a federal agency. Most mortgage lenders offer conventional loans, and many lenders sell these loans to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac — two government-sponsored enterprises. Conventional loans can have either fixed or adjustable rates, and terms ranging from 10 to 30 years.

You can get a conventional loan with a down payment as low as 3% of the home’s purchase price, so this type of loan makes sense if you don’t have enough for a traditional down payment. However, if your down payment is less than 20%, you’re required to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI), which is an insurance policy designed to protect the lender if you stop making payments. You can ask your servicer to cancel PMI once the principal balance of your mortgage falls below 80% of the original value of your home.

FHA loan

Minimum credit score (10% down): 500

Minimum credit score (3.5% down): 580

FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), a part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The FHA incentivizes lenders to make mortgage loans available to borrowers who might not otherwise qualify by guaranteeing the federal government will repay the mortgage if the borrower stops making payments. This makes an FHA loan a good option if you have a lower credit score.

FHA loans come in 15- or 30-year terms with fixed interest rates. Unlike conventional mortgages, which only require PMI for borrowers with less than 20% down, all FHA borrowers must pay an up-front mortgage insurance premium (MIP) and an annual MIP, as long as the loan is outstanding.

VA loan

Minimum credit score: N/A

VA loans are mortgages backed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA guarantees loans made by VA-approved lenders to qualifying veterans or service members of the U.S. armed forces, or their spouses. This type of loan is a great option for veterans and their spouses, especially if they don’t have the best credit and don’t have enough for a down payment.

VA loans are fixed-rate mortgages with 10-, 15-, 20- or 30-year terms.

Most VA loans don’t require a down payment or monthly mortgage insurance premiums. However, they do require a one-time VA funding fee, that ranges from 1.4% to 3.6% of the loan amount.

USDA loan

Minimum credit score: N/A

The U.S. Department of Agriculture guarantees loans for borrowers interested in buying homes in certain rural areas. USDA loans don’t require a minimum down payment, but you have to meet the USDA’s income eligibility limits, which vary by location.

All USDA mortgages have fixed interest rates and 30-year repayment terms.

USDA-approved lenders must pay an up-front guarantee fee of up to 3.5% of the purchase price to the USDA. That fee can be passed on to borrowers and financed into the home loan. If the home you want to buy is within an eligible rural area (defined by the USDA) and you meet the other requirements, this could be a great loan option for you.

What else do mortgage lenders consider?

Your credit score isn’t the only factor lenders consider when reviewing your loan application. Here are some of the other factors lenders use when deciding whether to give you a mortgage.

  • Debt-to-income ratio — Your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is the amount of debt payments you make each month (including your mortgage payments) relative to your gross monthly income. For example, if your mortgage payments, car loan and credit card payments add up to $1,800 per month and you have a $6,000 monthly income, your debt-to-income ratio would be $1,800/$6,000, or 30%. Most conventional mortgages require a DTI ratio no greater than 36%. However, you may be approved with a DTI up to 45% if you meet other requirements.
  • Employment history — When you apply for a mortgage, lenders will ask for proof of employment — typically two years’ worth of W-2s and tax returns, as well as your two most recent pay stubs. Lenders prefer to work with people who have stable employment and consistent income.
  • Down payment — Putting money down to buy a home gives you immediate equity in the home and helps to ensure the lender recoups their loss if you stop making payments and they need to foreclose on the home. Most loans — other than VA and USDA loans — require a down payment of at least 3%, although a higher down payment could help you qualify for a lower interest rate or make up for other less-than-ideal aspects of your mortgage application.
  • The home’s value and condition — Lenders want to ensure the home collateralizing the loan is in good condition and worth what you’re paying for it. Typically, they’ll require an appraisal to determine the home’s value and may also require a home inspection to ensure there aren’t any unknown issues with the property.

How is your credit score calculated?

Most talk of credit scores makes it sound as if you have only one score. In fact, you have several credit scores, and they may be used by different lenders and for different purposes.

The three national credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — collect information from banks, credit unions, lenders and public records to formulate your credit score. The most common and well-known scoring model is the FICO Score, which is based on the following five factors:

  • Payment history (35%) — A history of late payments will drag your score down, as will negative information from bankruptcies, foreclosures, repossessions or accounts referred to collections.
  • How much you owe (30%) — Your credit utilization ratio is the amount of revolving credit you’re using compared to your total available credit. For example, if you have one credit card with a $2,000 balance and a $4,000 credit limit, your credit utilization ratio is 50%. Credit scoring models view using a larger percentage of your available credit as risky behavior, so high balances and maxed-out credit cards will negatively impact your score.
  • Length of credit history (15%) — This factor considers the age of your oldest account, newest account and the average age of all your credit accounts. In general, the longer you’ve been using credit responsibly, the higher your score will be.
  • Types of accounts (10%) — Credit scoring models favor people who use a mix of credit cards, installment loans, mortgages and other types of credit.
  • Recent credit history (10%) — Lenders view applying for and opening several new credit accounts within a short period as a sign of financial trouble and it’ll negatively impact your score.

Ready to shop around for a mortgage?







Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916


American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364



Text/call: 502-905-3708

email: kentuckyloan@gmail.com

https://kentuckyloan.blogspot.com/

What is the minimum Credit Score Needed to Buy a House and get a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?

Credit Score Needed to Buy a House and get a Kentucky Mortgage?

Conventional Loan


• At least 3%-5% down• Closing costs will vary on which rate you choose and the lender. Typically, the higher the rate, the lesser closing costs due to the lender giving you a lender credit back at closing for over par pricing. Also, called a no-closing costs option. You have to weigh the pros and cons to see if it makes sense to forgo the lower rate and lower monthly payment for the higher rate and less closing costs.

Fico scores needed start at 620, but most conventional lenders will want a higher score to qualify for the 3-5% minimum down payment requirements Most buyers using this loan have high credit scores (over 720) and at least 5% down.

The rates are a little higher compared to FHA, VA, or USDA loan but the mortgage insurance is not for life of loan and can be rolled off when you reach 80% equity position in home. Conventional loans require 4-7 years removed from Bankruptcy and foreclosure.
Kentucky USDA Rural Housing Program

If you meet income eligibility requirements and are looking to settle in a rural area, you might qualify for the KY USDA Rural Housing program. The program guarantees qualifying loans, reducing lenders’ risk and encouraging them to offer buyers 100% loans. That means Kentucky home buyers don’t have to put any money down, and even the “upfront fee” (a closing cost for this type of loan) can be rolled into the financing.
 
Fico scores usually wanted for this program center around 620 range, with most lenders wanting a 640 score so they can obtain an automated approval through GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting system, and it will dictate your max loan pre-approval based on your income, credit scores, debt to income ratio and assets.
 
They also allow for a manual underwrite, which states that the max house payment ratios are set at 29% and 41% respectively of your income.

They loan requires no down payment, and the current mortgage insurance is 1% upfront, called a funding fee, and .35% annually for the monthly mi payment. Since they recently reduced their mi requirements, USDA is one of the best options out there for home buyers looking to buy in a rural area

A rural area typically will be any area outside the major cities of Louisville, Lexington, Paducah, Bowling Green, Richmond, Frankfort, and parts of Northern Kentucky. There is a map link below to see the qualifying areas.

There is also a max household income limits with most cutoff starting at 109,500 for a family of four, and up to $136,000 for a family of five or more.

The income limits change every spring, so make sure and check to see what updated income limits are.
USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy and foreclosure
There is no max USDA loan limit.
 

Kentucky FHA Loan


FHA loans are good for home buyers with lower credit scores and no much down, or with down payment assistance grants. FHA will allow for grants, gifts, for their 3.5% minimum investment and will go down to a 580-credit score.
 
The current mortgage insurance requirements are kind of steep when compared to USDA, VA, but the rates are usually good so it can counteract the high mi premiums. As I tell borrowers, you will not have the loan for 30 years, so don’t worry too much about the mi premiums.
 
The mi premiums are for life of loan like USDA.
 
FHA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and 3 years removed from foreclosure. 
 

Kentucky VA Loan


VA loans are for veterans and active-duty military personnel. The loan requires no down payment and no monthly mi premiums, saving you on the monthly payment. It does have an funding fee like USDA, but it is higher starting at 2% for first time use, and 3% for second time use. The funding fee is financed into the loan, so it is not something you have to pay upfront out of pocket.
 
VA loans can be made anywhere, unlike the USDA restrictions, and there is no income household limit and no max loan limits in Kentucky
 
Most VA lenders I work with will want a 580-credit score, even though VA says in their guidelines there is no minimum score, good luck finding a lender
VA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy or foreclosure
Clear Caviars needed to for a VA loan.
 

Kentucky Down Payment Assistance


This type of loan is administered by KHC in the state of Kentucky. They typically have $10,000 down payment assistance year around, that is in the form of a second mortgage that you pay back over 10 years.



Sometimes they will come to market with other down payment assistance and lower market rates to benefit lower income households with not a lot of money for down payment.

KHC offers FHA, VA, USDA, and Conventional loans with their minimum credit scores being set at 620 for all programs. The conventional loan requirements at KHC requires 660 credit score.
The max debt to income ratios is set at 40% and 50% respectively.

What is the minimum Credit Score Needed to Buy a House and get a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?










Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior Loan Officer
Text/call 502-905-3708

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3

Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346


kentuckyloan@gmail.com


If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.


Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant's eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant

Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916


http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/




What is the minimum Credit Score Needed to Buy a House and get a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?

Kentucky Mortgage Guidelines for Income, Employment, and credit scores

Kentucky Mortgage Lender for First Time Home Buyers for FHA, VA, USDA, KHC Kentucky Housing







Kentucky Home Loans Preapproval Checklist
  • A driver’s license or U.S. passport
  • Verification of employment
  • Recent pay stubs covering the last 30 days
  • W-2 forms from the previous two years
  • Last two years of personal federal income tax returns with all pages and schedules. If self-employed, last two years of individual federal income tax returns with all pages and schedules, as well as a business license, a year-to-date profit and loss statement (P&L), a balance sheet, and a signed CPA letter stating you are still in business
  • Bank account statements proving that you have enough to cover the down payment and closing costs. If someone is helping you with the down payment, a gift letter stating that the fund is a gift a
  • Last quarterly statements for asset accounts (401(k), IRA, stock accounts, mutual funds)

Kentucky Mortgage Loan Preapproval: What To Know

What affects your home loan preapproval

Your income, work history, credit score, money down and  saving are key factors that lenders will consider during the mortgage process.

Employment Status for Kentucky Mortgage Pre-Approval

Self-employed individual requires two-year tax returns'.

Only borrowers who have an ownership interest of 25% or more in a business and are not W-2 employees are considered “self-employed.” However, there is an exception if the borrower can show a two-year history in a similar line of work, which includes having documentation that proves an equal or higher income in the new role compared to the W2 position.

Debt-to-Income Ratio

The debt-to-income ratio is the percentage of your monthly gross income that goes toward paying debts. There are two types of DTI that lenders will consider during the mortgage process: front-end and back-end. The first consists only of your housing-related expenses, whereas the latter also includes all your minimum required monthly debts.

The lower your DTI, the better your chances of securing a home loan. 

For example, FHA loans secured by the government have more lenient requirements — you can have a DTI of up to 57% and still get approved for an FHA home loan. USDA loans used to buy homes in rural areas have a lower maximum DTI of 45%.

Loan-to-Value Ratio

The loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is a number lenders use to determine how risky a loan to a potential borrower might be. It measures the relationship between the loan amount and the market value of the property you want to buy, and it can also determine whether mortgage insurance will be required.

All mortgages have a maximum LTV to qualify. However, just like with DTI, the LTV varies depending on the loan. FHA loans, for example, have an LTV of 96.5% since they allow down payments of as little as 3.4%.

Going for an LTV of 80% or less is “ideal” because you get unique benefits as a buyer, but that requires a down payment of 20%. Ultimately, each buyer will need to figure out their own LTV based on how large a down payment they can afford.

Credit History and FICO Score for Kentucky Mortgages 

Your credit history is one of the most important factors when it comes to getting a mortgage.

Credit History and FICO Score for Kentucky Mortgages





Best Kentucky Mortgage Lender for First Time Home Buyers in Kentucky

You don’t need a perfect credit score to buy a house, but those with outstanding scores are usually rewarded with lower interest rates and a greater variety of payment options. Buyers with very poor credit have the option of finding a co-signer who has better credit than them to help secure the loan.

Why Getting Preapproved Is Such a Big Deal

Getting preapproved for a mortgage helps you shop for homes that you can afford and shows you are a serious buyer.

But a letter of preapproval is more than just a way to look good to sellers. It also helps you find the right mortgage lender and provides some flexibility in bargaining or negotiating for a better price range or specific costs, repairs, and improvements to a home.

Getting preapproved makes the entire closing process faster, too. It takes an average of 30 to 45 days to close on a house in Kentucky, and part of that period is due to the process of mortgage approval, title search, appraisal report, home inspections, verifying employment and bank account info along with taxes and w-2s and paystubs to validate the pre-approval.

What are standard continuity of employment requirements?

A borrower will need to verify a two-year cumulative employment history. Less than two year may be 

offset via school transcripts; if guaranteed hourly (40) or salaried in nature, the base income 

will be allowable. Variable earnings will require at minimum 12 months receipt on current position; 

OT, Bonus and commission are considered variable however, must reflect a cumulative two- year 

history of receipt.


What income can I use for a traveling nurse?

A minimum 12-month history of contract nursing work is required. Income documentation must

 include  copies of applicable contracts and WVOE’s for each position. The income will be averaged. 

Standard two- year employment history required.


Do we allow one score on a conventional transaction? No score?

Yes! If the borrower has three scores, the middle score is to be used; two scores, the lower score 

is to be used; one score, that score is to be used.  If no score, only allowable with AUS A/E and 

less than 50% of transactional income contributions. We do not average scores.


Can I use part time or secondary income for qualifying purposes?

Yes! Conventional~ secondary employment will require a two- year history of receipt to use in 

conjunction with the primary employment earnings. Multiple second jobs over this time frame are 

allowable however the borrower may not have a job gap > one month in length. Part time employment 

alone will be considered variable in nature and will require a minimum 12- month history; earnings 

will be averaged. FHA~ will require an uninterrupted two- year history for utilization.


When must a borrower start a new job in conjunction with future employment?

Conventional requires a start date within 90 days of the Note date. FHA requires a start date 

within 60 days of note date. VA max 60 days of note date. Non contingent contract required for each 

entity.


What type of income(s) are considered illegal?

Foreign shell banks; medical marijuana dispensaries; any business or activity related to 

recreational marijuana-use , growing, selling or supplying- even if permitted by state or local law.

 Policy is not limited to  owner of business.


Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Text/call:      502-905-3708
fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com