Showing posts with label credit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label credit. Show all posts

Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use.

Great information to share with your clients that uses Credit Karma. A lot of people do not know that the Credit Karma app is a Vantage Score.

Credit Karma is NOT Free!
Credit Karma makes money off of the personal information you volunteered!
Credit Karma is NOT a credit monitoring site! - They collect your information from the credit agencies to create targeted campaigns based on your personal information which makes Credit Karma an affiliate marketing site!
Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use.
Credit Karma provides you with Vantage scores (Not heavily used by lenders)
Credit Karma buys your information for pennies on the dollar, this is how they are able to provide you with updates every 7 days.
Why?... To get you to look at your scores and their AFFILIATE offers! You know, the offers for those credit cards that say you have a fair, good or very good chance of being approved for....
Have you noticed they never say, "You have a bad or poor chance”?
Apply, get denied and now you have an inquiry on your credit profile.
For those of you that are seeing you have a "chance" of getting approved for an American Express πŸ’³ think again... You would be surprised to know, American Express only pulls from Experian for credit cards?
Credit Karma DOES NOT give you Experian credit report or scores

While it’s common knowledge that mortgage lenders use FICO scores, most people with a credit history have three FICO scores, one from each of the three national credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion). 


Credit Karma DOES NOT give you FICO scores! Which is what mortgage lenders use. Which FICO Score is Used for Mortgages?



  • Which FICO Score is Used for Mortgages?

Most lenders determine a borrower’s creditworthiness based on FICO® scores, a Credit Score developed by Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO™). This score tells the lender what type of credit risk you are and what your interest rate should be to reflect that risk. FICO scores have different names at each of the three major United States credit reporting companies. And there are different versions of the FICO formula. Here are the specific versions of the FICO formula used by mortgage lenders:

  • Equifax Beacon 5.0
  • Experian/Fair Isaac Risk Model v2
  • TransUnion FICO Risk Score 04

Lenders have identified a strong correlation between Mortgage performance and FICO Bureau scores (FICO score). FICO scores range from 300 to 850. The lower the FICO score, the greater the risk of default.

Which Score Gets Used?

Since most people have three FICO scores, one from each credit bureau, how do lenders choose which one to use?

For a FICO score to be considered “usable”, it must be based on adequate, concrete information. If there is too little information, or if the information is inaccurate, the FICO score may be deemed unusable for the mortgage underwriting process. Once the underwriter has determined if a score is usable or not, here’s how they decide which score(s) to use for an individual borrower:

  • If all three scores are different, they use the middle score
  • If two of the scores are the same, they use that score, regardless of whether the two repeated scores are higher or lower than the third score

Lenders have identified a strong correlation between Mortgage performance and FICO Bureau scores (FICO score). FICO scores range from 300 to 850. The lower the FICO score, the greater the risk of default.

If it helps to visualize this information:

Identifying the Underwriting Score
ExampleScore 1Score 2Score 3Underwriting Score
Borrower 1680700720700
     

Joel Lobb

Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916

 

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

10602 Timberwood Circle 

Louisville, KY 40223

Company NMLS ID #1364

click here for directions to our office

 

Text/call:      502-905-3708

fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com

 

https://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/

 

 
 

 

 
 
Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
 
 Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 

text or call my phone: (502) 905-3708
email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com

The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people. NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). USDA Mortgage loans only offered in Kentucky.

All loans and lines are subject to credit approval, verification, and collateral evaluation

Effective on 9/18/21, Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying

 

Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying

Do you and your partner have very different credit scores? Great news! You may have access to more loan program options than you thought!

Here's the deal... All lenders pull FICO scores from each of the three credit bureaus to qualify a borrower. In situations with co-applicants, we will use the lower of the two middle scores for qualifying purposes. Historically, to do a Conventional Loan, both mid-scores would have to be above 620.
Effective on 9/18/21, Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying. This critical change may help many borrowers qualify and have increased advantages when putting an offer in on a home.
Long story short - we can help you now more than ever. Curious if this will help you? Reach out to me today, and we can investigate.
PS: These changes are effective September 18th, 2021 and there are still a lot of other variables to consider and guidelines are always subject to change. Let's start a conversation today! Message me for more details or to get started.

Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying
Effective on 9/18/21, Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying    Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying Do you and your partner have very different credit scores? Great news!  You may have access to more loan program options than you thought!    Here's the deal... All lenders pull FICO scores from each of the three credit bureaus to qualify a borrower.  In situations with co-applicants, we will use the lower of the two middle scores for qualifying purposes. Historically, to do a Conventional Loan, both mid-scores would have to be above 620. Effective on 9/18/21, Fannie Mae announced that their Automated Underwriting System will now take an AVERAGE of the two scores for qualifying.  This critical change may help many borrowers qualify and have increased advantages when putting an offer in on a home. Long story short - we can help you now more than ever.  Curious if this will help you?  Reach out to me today, and we can investigate. PS: These changes are effective September 18th, 2021 and there are still a lot of other variables to consider and guidelines are always subject to change.  Let's start a conversation today!  Message me for more details or to get started.



Mortgage Application Checklist of Documents Needed below  πŸ‘‡

W-2 forms (previous 2 years)
Paycheck stubs (last 30 days - most current)
Employer name and address (2 year history including any gaps)
Bank accounts statement (recent 2 months – all pages
Statements for 401(k)s, stocks and other investments (most recent)
federal tax returns (previous 2 years)
Residency history (2 year history)
Photo identification for applicant and co-applicant (valid Driver’s License





click on link for mortgage pre-approval


Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)


Senior Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223


Company ID #1364 | MB73346

Text/call 502-905-3708


kentuckyloan@gmail.com



If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.


Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant's eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/


NMLS Consumer Access for Joel Lobb 

Accessibility for Website 

Privacy Policy





Joel Lobb 

Joel Lobb, American Mortgage Solutions (Statewide)

Joel has worked with KHC for 12 of his 20 years in the mortgage lending business. Joel said, “A lot of my clients would not have been able to purchase a home of their own or possibly delayed their purchase due to lack of down payment but with the $6,000 DAP loan program, this gets them into a house sooner and starts their path to homeownership while building equity instead of throwing their money away.”

When you’re ready to purchase a home in Joel's area, contact him at:
Phone: 502-905-3708
Email: Kentuckyloan@gmail.com
Website: www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com







Disputes on Credit Report and Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval?


Applying for a Mortgage Soon? Don't Dispute that Account


Applying for a Kentucky Mortgage Soon?
Don't Dispute that Account



     Sounds counterintuitive, I'm sure ...

     But until you've talked to me (or your own local Mortgage Originator), don't even think about disputing an account found on your Credit Report.

     Why?  Unknowingly, you can be creating real problems for your Mortgage Application and Approval. 

     Consider this:  A creditor can refuse to change their disputed rating.  Too many disputed accounts on a Credit Report may result in your loan being denied.

     Is that a really a risk you want to run at such an important time?

     A formal dispute placed on a car loan, student loan, credit card, collection ... or even worse, a mortgage loan ... can cause havoc for your new Mortgage Application.  So ...

     Slow down.  Contact me ... and let's talk.  We'll analyze all your options and see what action is appropriate and in your best interest.  

     What is not commonly known:  Credit Bureaus and Automated Underwriting systems now reflect an evolution that has taken place over the last few years regarding credit disputes.  

     Both the Bureaus and Underwriting systems have been re-worked to recognize disputes as a negative impact and rating on a Borrower's "approvability" or "credit-worthiness".  

     But these changes have taken place without much fanfare and public recognition.  And because of that, hopeful Borrowers have all too often been contributing to the issues faced within their Mortgage Process later.     

     Prospective Mortgage Applicants (and the public in general) must be educated to this fact.  The temptation to dispute an account must be avoided, if hoping to finance a home via a Mortgage Loan soon.       

     If a Creditor offers-up a path to formally dispute your account ... just say no!  At least prior to our talking.

     There may be a better course of action available to you.  During our conversation we'll weigh your options and best course as it pertains to your Mortgage and your Approval.  

     But providing solid, written proof and evidence regarding your stance on the account in question, WITHOUT placing a formal "dispute" on said account is often the most prudent course of action ... 

     Remember:  You must have legitimate data and written proof in order to accomplish your goal successfully.  But when you have that proof, your account can be "re-rated" or the derogatory rating can be deleted from your Credit Report. 

     Any "correction" should come from the Creditor (Credit Card company/bank/etc.) and immediately sent to each of the 3 Credit Bureaus (ExperianTransUnionEquifax).  

     This final step trips-up way too many, as it's assumed that the Creditor(s) will share the new updated information with the 3 Credit Bureaus.  They may or may not.  

     Bottomline:  It remains YOUR responsibility to inform each of the 3 Bureaus.  

     Play it safe and follow through with this important task, as it's in your best interest to see that it's successfully done.   

     When a correction is reported to the Bureaus, they will, in turn, update your Credit Report.  While each case is different (and I do not represent that all results will be successful or as hoped for) ... you may head off potential issues with your Mortgage Approval by acting pro-actively.  Consult with a Credit Repair Specialist if uncertain of corrective steps to be taken.

     In the modern Mortgage Process, the experience level of the Mortgage Originator you choose can't be understated.  Successful navigation through the steps of addressing credit disputes and credit analysis is just one example of this fact.

What credit score do mortgage lenders use?

The best-known credit scores are going to fall under either the FICO or VantageScore brands. There are multiple generations of each score brand, as every few years, the score developers create newer versions. So, for example, there’s a VantageScore 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0.

In most lending environments outside of mortgages, it’s hard to know which specific credit score a lender will use to evaluate your application. And, even if you knew your lender used a FICO Score or a VantageScore credit score, you still would not know which generation of the score it is using.

For example, you may apply for an auto loan with one lender that checks your FICO Auto Score 8 based on your Experian credit report. Yet, if you apply for financing with a different auto lender, it may opt to check your VantageScore 3.0 score based on TransUnion data.

The only way to know for sure is to ask the lender which credit report and which credit score version it plans to check, but that isn’t a guarantee that they’ll tell you.

The mortgage industry is different. Because of the aforementioned FHFA mandate, mortgage lenders must use the following versions of FICO’s scoring models:


FICO Model

Description
FICO 9Newest version. Not widely used.
FICO 8Most common. Used for Auto and Bankcard lending.
FICO 5Used by mortgage lenders. Built on data from Equifax.
FICO 4Used by mortgage lenders. Built on data from TransUnion.
FICO 2Used by mortgage lenders. Built on data from Experian.


  • Experian: FICO Score 2, sometimes referred to as FICO V2 or FICO-II
  • TransUnion: FICO Score 4, sometimes referred to as FICO Classic 04
  • Equifax: FICO Score 5, sometimes referred to as BEACON 5.0


Why Do Mortgage Lenders Use Older FICO Scores?

The reason mortgage lenders use older FICO Scores is because they don’t have a choice. They are essentially forced to use them.

Unlike every other industry, mortgage lenders don’t have the flexibility to choose the scoring model brand or generation they want to use. Mortgage lenders must follow the direction of the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs), Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, as it pertains to scoring models.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac

The GSEs play an important role in mortgage lending. These publicly traded companies buy mortgages from banks, bundle them together, and sell them to investors. This frees up funds so that banks can offer new mortgages to additional homebuyers.

For a bank to sell a mortgage to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, the loan has to meet certain guidelines. Some of these guidelines require borrowers to have a minimum credit score under specific FICO Score generations.

If a lender uses a different scoring model other than what the GSEs approve when it underwrites a mortgage, it probably won’t be able to sell that mortgage after it issues the loan. This limits the lender’s ability to write new loans because it will have less money available to lend to future borrowers


Link to article below

https://www.badcredit.org/how-to/which-fico-score-do-mortgage-lenders-use/

About FICO® Scores

 


About FICO® Scores

CollapseWhat is a credit score?

A credit score is a number that summarizes your credit risk to lenders, or the likelihood that you’ll pay the lender back the amount you borrowed plus interest. The score is based on a snapshot of your credit report(s) at one of the three major credit bureaus—Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®—at a particular point in time, and helps lenders evaluate your credit risk. Your credit score can influence the credit that’s available to you and the terms, such as interest rate, that lenders offer you.

CollapseWhat is a credit bureau?

A credit bureau, also known as a consumer reporting agency, collects and stores individual credit information and provides it to creditors so they can make decisions on granting loans and other credit activities. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders, and credit card issuers. The three largest credit bureaus in the U.S. are Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®.

CollapseWhat are FICO® Scores?

FICO® Scores are the most widely used credit scores and are used in over 90% of U.S. lending decisions. Your FICO® Scores (you have more than one) are based on the data generated from your credit reports at the three major credit bureaus, Experian®, TransUnion® and Equifax®. Each of your FICO® Scores is a three-digit number summarizing your credit risk, that predicts how likely you are to pay back your credit obligations as agreed.

CollapseWhat it the highest credit score?

Most credit scoring models follow a credit score range of 300 to 850 with that 850 being the highest score you can have. However, there can be other ranges for different models, some of which are customized for a particular industry (credit card, auto lending, or insurance for example). While the majority follow the 300 to 850 range, there are some scores (e.g., FICO® Bankcard Score) that range from 250 to 900 and others that may use other score ranges. For more information on the different scoring models, view Understanding the difference between credit scores.

CollapseWhy do FICO® Scores fluctuate?

There are many reasons why your score may change. The information on your credit report changes each time lenders report new activity to the credit bureau. So, as the information in your credit report at that bureau changes, your FICO® Scores may also change. Keep in mind that certain events such as late payments or bankruptcy can lower your FICO® Scores quickly.

FICO® Scores consider five main categories of information in your credit report.

  • Your payment history
  • The amount of money you currently owe
  • The length of your credit history
  • New credit accounts
  • Types of credit in use

CollapseWhat are the minimum requirements to produce a FICO® Score?

In order for a FICO® Score to be calculated, a credit report must contain these minimum requirements:

  • At least one account that has been open for six months or more.
  • At least one account that has been reported to the credit reporting agency within the past six months.
  • No indication of deceased on the credit report (Please note: if you share an account with another person and the other account holder is reported deceased, it is important to check your credit report to make sure you are not impacted).

CollapseDoes a FICO® Score alone determine whether I get credit?

No. Most lenders use a number of factors to make credit decisions, including a FICO® Score. Lenders may look at information such as the amount of debt you are able to handle reasonably given your income, your employment history, and your credit history. Based on their review of this information, as well as their specific underwriting policies, lenders may extend credit to you even with a low FICO® Score, or decline your request for credit even with a high FICO® Score.

CollapseHow long will negative information remain on my credit reports?

It depends on the type of negative information. Here’s the basic breakdown of how long different types of negative information will remain on your credit reports:

  • Late payments: 7 years from the original delinquency date.
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcies: 10 years from the filing date.
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcies: 7 years from the filing date.
  • Collection accounts: 7 years from the original delinquency date of the account
  • Public Record: Generally 7 years

Keep in Mind: For all of these negative items, the older they are the less impact they will have on your FICO® Scores. For example, a collection that is 5 years old will hurt much less than a collection that is 5 months old.

CollapseAre FICO® Scores unfair to minorities?

No. FICO® Scores do not consider your gender, race, nationality or marital status. In fact, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits lenders from considering this type of information when issuing credit. Independent research has shown that FICO® Scores are not unfair to minorities or people with little credit history. FICO® Scores have proven to be an accurate and consistent measure of repayment for all people who have some credit history. In other words, at a given FICO® Score, non-minority and minority applicants are equally likely to pay as agreed.

CollapseHow are FICO® Scores calculated for married couples?

Married couples don’t share joint FICO® Scores; each person has their own individual credit report, which is used to calculate FICO® Scores, and isn’t impacted by their spouse’s credit history. However, married couples should be mindful of the potential impact of opening joint credit accounts. For example, if you get a new credit card in both spouses’ names, and there is a late payment on that account, the late payment will impact both individuals’ FICO® Scores.

CollapseHow can I access my credit report?

By federal law, you are entitled to one free credit report every 12 months from each credit reporting company, TransUnion®, Equifax®, and Experian®. Find them at annualcreditreport.com. Take advantage of this service annually to ensure the information on your credit report is current and accurate.



Impacts to FICO® Scores

CollapseWill closing a credit card account impact my FICO® Score?

It is possible that closing a credit account may have a negative impact depending on a few factors. FICO® Scores may consider your “credit utilization rate”, which looks at your total used credit in relation to your total available credit. Essentially, it measures how much of your available credit you are actually using. The more of your credit that you use, the higher your utilization rate and high credit utilization rates may negatively impact your FICO® Score. Before you close any credit card account, Wells Fargo recommends that you should first consider whether you really need to close the account or if your real intention is just to stop using that credit card. If you really just want to stop using that card, it may make sense if you stop using the card and put it somewhere for safe keeping in case of an emergency. It’s also important to note that length of your credit history accounts for 15% of your FICO® Score calculation. Therefore, having credit card accounts that are open and in good standing for a long time may affect your FICO® Score.

CollapseHow does refinancing impact my FICO® Score?

Refinancing and loan modifications may affect your FICO® Scores in a few areas. How much these affect the score depends on whether it’s reported to the consumer reporting agencies as the same loan with changes or as an entirely new loan. There are many reasons why a score may change. FICO® Scores are calculated using many different pieces of credit data in your credit report. This data is grouped into five categories: payment history (35%), amounts owed (30%), length of credit history (15%), new credit (10%) and credit mix (10%). If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as the same loan with changes, two pieces of information associated with the loan modification may affect your score: the new credit inquiry and changes to the amounts owed. If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as a “new” loan, your score could still be affected by the new credit inquiry and an increase in amounts owed,— along with the additional impact of a new “open date” which may affect the credit history category. In the end, a new or recent open date typically indicates that it is a new credit obligation and, as a result, may impact the score more than if the terms of the existing loan are simply changed.

CollapseHow do FICO® Scores consider loan shopping?

In general, if you are “loan shopping” - meaning that you are applying for the same type of loan with similar amounts with multiple lenders in a short period of time - your FICO® Score will consider your “shopping” as a single credit inquiry on your score if the shopping occurs within a short time period (30 to 45 day) depending on which FICO® Score version is used by your lenders.

CollapseWhat are the different categories of late payments and do they impact FICO® Scores?

A history of payments is the largest factor in FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores consider late payments in these general areas; how recent the late payments are, how severe the late payments are, and how frequently the late payments occur. So this means that a recent late payment could be more damaging to a FICO® Score than a number of late payments that happened a long time ago. Late payments are listed on credit reports by how late the payments are. Typically, creditors report late payments in one of these categories: 30-days late, 60-days late, 90-days late, 120-days late, 150-days late, or charge off (written off as a loss because of severe delinquency). Of course a 90-day late is worse than a 30-day late, but the important thing to understand is that people who continually pay their bills on time tend to appear less risky to lenders. However, for people who continue not to pay debt, and their creditor either charges it off or sends it to a collection agency, it is considered a significant event with regard to a score and will likely have a severe negative impact.

CollapseHow does a bankruptcy impact my FICO® Score?

A bankruptcy is considered a very negative event by FICO® Scores. As long as the bankruptcy is listed on your credit report, it will be factored into your scores. How much of an impact it will have on your score will depend on your entire credit profile. As the bankruptcy item ages, its impact on a FICO® Score gradually decreases. Typically, here is how long you can expect bankruptcies to remain on your credit reports (from the date filed):

  • Chapter 11 and 7 bankruptcies up to 10 years.
  • Completed Chapter 13 bankruptcies up to 7 years.

These dates and time periods refer to the public record item associated with filing for bankruptcy. All of the individual accounts included in the bankruptcy should be removed from your credit reports after 7 years.

CollapseHow do public records and judgments impact FICO® Scores?

Public records are legal documents created and maintained by Federal and local governments, which are usually accessible to the public. Some public records, such as divorces, are not considered by FICO® Scores, but adverse public records, which include bankruptcies, are considered by FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores may be affected by the mere presence of an adverse public record, whether paid or not. Adverse public records will have less effect on a FICO® Score as time passes, but they can remain in your credit reports for up to ten years based on what type of public record it is.

CollapseWhat are inquiries and how do they impact FICO® Scores?

Inquiries may or may not affect FICO® Scores. Credit inquiries are classified as either “hard inquiries” or “soft inquiries”—only hard inquiries have an effect on FICO® Scores.

Soft inquiries are all credit inquiries where your credit is NOT being reviewed by a prospective lender. FICO® Scores do not take into account any involuntary (soft) inquiries made by businesses with which you did not apply for credit, inquiries from employers, or your own requests to see your credit report. Soft inquiries also include inquiries from businesses checking your credit to offer you goods or services (such as promotional offers by credit card companies) and credit checks from businesses with which you already have a credit account. If you are receiving FICO® Scores for free from a business with which you already have a credit account, there is no additional inquiry made on your credit report. FICO® Scores take into account only voluntary (hard) inquiries that result from your application for credit. Hard inquiries include credit checks when you’ve applied for an auto loan, mortgage, credit card or other types of loans. Each of these types of credit checks count as a single inquiry. Inquiries may have a greater impact if you have few accounts or a short credit history. Large numbers of inquiries also mean greater risk.

CollapseHow does applying for new credit impact my FICO® Score?

Applying for new credit only accounts for about 10% of a FICO® Score. Exactly how much applying for new credit affects your score depends on your overall credit profile and what else is already in your credit reports. For example, applying for new credit may have a greater impact on your FICO® Scores if you only have a few accounts or a short credit history. That said, there are definitely a few things to be aware of depending on the type of credit you are applying for. When you apply for credit, a credit check or “inquiry” can be requested to check your credit standing.