Showing posts with label fha loan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label fha loan. Show all posts

Kentucky first-time homebuyers with a focus on FHA, VA, USDA Home loans in Kentucky



Here's a summary of different loan programs for Kentucky first-time homebuyers with a focus on
FHA, VA, USDA Home loans in Kentucky  




FHA Loan:


Credit Score: Typically requires a minimum credit score of 580; borrowers with lower scores may still qualify but may need a larger down payment.
Down Payment: Minimum down payment of 3.5%.
Income Ratio: Front-end ratio (housing expenses to income) should not exceed 31%; back-end ratio (total debt to income) should not exceed 43%.
Work History: Generally requires at least two years of steady employment, though exceptions can be made.
Credit, Bankruptcy, and Foreclosure: More forgiving than conventional loans; may consider borrowers with past bankruptcy or foreclosure.
Employment and Work History: Stable employment and income are essential.
Time to Close: Typically around 30-45 days. Appraisal and property requirements follow FHA guidelines.


VA Loan:


Credit Score:VA doesn't set a minimum score; lenders may have their requirements, often around 620 or higher.
Down Payment: No down payment required for most borrowers.
Income Ratio: Flexible debt-to-income ratios, often up to 41% or higher in certain cases.
Work History: Stable employment history is preferred.
Credit, Bankruptcy, and Foreclosure: More lenient on past credit issues; may consider borrowers with past bankruptcy or foreclosure.
Employment and Work History: Consistent income from stable employment is crucial.
Time to Close: VA loans can take 45-60 days to close. Appraisal and property requirements must meet VA standards.


USDA Loan:


Credit Score: Typically requires a minimum credit score of 640; exceptions may be possible with compensating factors.
Down Payment: No down payment required for eligible borrowers.
Income Ratio: Maximum debt-to-income ratio of 41%, though exceptions may be made with strong compensating factors.
Work History: Stable employment history is preferred, typically two years or more.
Credit, Bankruptcy, and Foreclosure: Consideration for borrowers with past credit issues, bankruptcy, or foreclosure.
Employment and Work History: Consistent income from stable employment is important.
Time to Close: USDA loans may take 30-60 days to close. Appraisal and property requirements must meet USDA guidelines.

Each loan program has specific eligibility criteria and requirements, so it's essential for first-time homebuyers to consult with lenders or mortgage experts to determine the best fit based on their financial situation and goals.



 Appraisal requirements and income documentation

 


FHA Loan:Appraisal Requirements:

The property must meet FHA guidelines, including minimum property standards and safety requirements. An FHA-approved appraiser assesses the property's value and condition.
Income Documentation: Generally requires recent pay stubs, W-2 forms, tax returns for the past two years, and proof of additional income sources (if applicable).


VA Loan:Appraisal Requirements:

 VA loans require a VA appraisal conducted by a VA-assigned appraiser. The appraisal assesses the property's value and ensures it meets VA's Minimum Property Requirements (MPRs).
Income Documentation: Typically includes pay stubs, W-2 forms, tax returns for the past two years, and proof of any additional income (e.g., bonuses, alimony, rental income).

USDA Loan:Appraisal Requirements:

USDA loans require a USDA appraisal to determine the property's value and ensure it meets USDA's standards for safety and livability.

Income Documentation: 


Similar to FHA and VA loans, USDA loans require pay stubs, W-2 forms, tax returns for the past two years, and documentation of other income sources.

These appraisal requirements and income documentation are crucial parts of the loan application process. Lenders use this information to assess the property's value, ensure it meets safety standards, and verify the borrower's income stability and ability to repay the loan.



here's a summary of different loan programs for kentucky first-time homebuyers with a focus on fha, va, usda home loans in kentucky











Hope your day is full of sunshine๐Ÿ˜Š

Joel Lobb  Mortgage Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364

Text/call: 502-905-3708
fax: 502-327-9119
email:
 kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/


NMLS 57916  | Company NMLS #1364/MB73346135166/MBR1574


The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval
nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).

How to Qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Home Loan




How to qualify for a mortgage

The type of mortgage you’re applying for determines the minimum requirements you’ll have to meet for your down payment, credit score, and debt-to-income ratio.

Find out what type of loan you might qualify for or what aspects of your finances you’ll need to improve to get a better shot at qualifying for a mortgage.

Loan TypeMin. Down PaymentMin. Credit ScoreMax DTIProperty Type
Conventional3%62045%Primary, secondary, investment
VA0%nonenonePrimary
FHA3.5%50050%Primary
USDA0%none41%Primary

Keep in mind: The minimum down payment, minimum credit score, and maximum DTI shown in the table apply to mortgages used to purchase a primary residence. While you can use a conventional loan or a jumbo loan to purchase a home for another purpose, you might need a larger down payment, a higher credit score, more cash reserves, or all three.

Credit score needed to buy a house

Mortgage lending is risky, and lenders want a way to quantify that risk. They use your three-digit credit score to gauge the risk of loaning you money since your credit score helps predict your likelihood of paying back a loan on time. Lenders also consider other data, such as your income, employment, debts and assets to decide whether to offer you a loan.

Different lenders and loan types have different borrower requirements, loan terms and minimum credit scores. Here are the requirements for some of the most common types of mortgages.

Conventional loan

Minimum credit score: 620

A conventional loan is a mortgage that isn’t backed by a federal agency. Most mortgage lenders offer conventional loans, and many lenders sell these loans to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac — two government-sponsored enterprises. Conventional loans can have either fixed or adjustable rates, and terms ranging from 10 to 30 years.

You can get a conventional loan with a down payment as low as 3% of the home’s purchase price, so this type of loan makes sense if you don’t have enough for a traditional down payment. However, if your down payment is less than 20%, you’re required to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI), which is an insurance policy designed to protect the lender if you stop making payments. You can ask your servicer to cancel PMI once the principal balance of your mortgage falls below 80% of the original value of your home.

FHA loan

Minimum credit score (10% down): 500

Minimum credit score (3.5% down): 580

FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), a part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The FHA incentivizes lenders to make mortgage loans available to borrowers who might not otherwise qualify by guaranteeing the federal government will repay the mortgage if the borrower stops making payments. This makes an FHA loan a good option if you have a lower credit score.

FHA loans come in 15- or 30-year terms with fixed interest rates. Unlike conventional mortgages, which only require PMI for borrowers with less than 20% down, all FHA borrowers must pay an up-front mortgage insurance premium (MIP) and an annual MIP, as long as the loan is outstanding.

VA loan

Minimum credit score: N/A

VA loans are mortgages backed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA guarantees loans made by VA-approved lenders to qualifying veterans or service members of the U.S. armed forces, or their spouses. This type of loan is a great option for veterans and their spouses, especially if they don’t have the best credit and don’t have enough for a down payment.

VA loans are fixed-rate mortgages with 10-, 15-, 20- or 30-year terms.

Most VA loans don’t require a down payment or monthly mortgage insurance premiums. However, they do require a one-time VA funding fee, that ranges from 1.4% to 3.6% of the loan amount.

USDA loan

Minimum credit score: N/A

The U.S. Department of Agriculture guarantees loans for borrowers interested in buying homes in certain rural areas. USDA loans don’t require a minimum down payment, but you have to meet the USDA’s income eligibility limits, which vary by location.

All USDA mortgages have fixed interest rates and 30-year repayment terms.

USDA-approved lenders must pay an up-front guarantee fee of up to 3.5% of the purchase price to the USDA. That fee can be passed on to borrowers and financed into the home loan. If the home you want to buy is within an eligible rural area (defined by the USDA) and you meet the other requirements, this could be a great loan option for you.

What else do mortgage lenders consider?

Your credit score isn’t the only factor lenders consider when reviewing your loan application. Here are some of the other factors lenders use when deciding whether to give you a mortgage.

  • Debt-to-income ratio — Your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is the amount of debt payments you make each month (including your mortgage payments) relative to your gross monthly income. For example, if your mortgage payments, car loan and credit card payments add up to $1,800 per month and you have a $6,000 monthly income, your debt-to-income ratio would be $1,800/$6,000, or 30%. Most conventional mortgages require a DTI ratio no greater than 36%. However, you may be approved with a DTI up to 45% if you meet other requirements.
  • Employment history — When you apply for a mortgage, lenders will ask for proof of employment — typically two years’ worth of W-2s and tax returns, as well as your two most recent pay stubs. Lenders prefer to work with people who have stable employment and consistent income.
  • Down payment — Putting money down to buy a home gives you immediate equity in the home and helps to ensure the lender recoups their loss if you stop making payments and they need to foreclose on the home. Most loans — other than VA and USDA loans — require a down payment of at least 3%, although a higher down payment could help you qualify for a lower interest rate or make up for other less-than-ideal aspects of your mortgage application.
  • The home’s value and condition — Lenders want to ensure the home collateralizing the loan is in good condition and worth what you’re paying for it. Typically, they’ll require an appraisal to determine the home’s value and may also require a home inspection to ensure there aren’t any unknown issues with the property.

How is your credit score calculated?

Most talk of credit scores makes it sound as if you have only one score. In fact, you have several credit scores, and they may be used by different lenders and for different purposes.

The three national credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — collect information from banks, credit unions, lenders and public records to formulate your credit score. The most common and well-known scoring model is the FICO Score, which is based on the following five factors:

  • Payment history (35%) — A history of late payments will drag your score down, as will negative information from bankruptcies, foreclosures, repossessions or accounts referred to collections.
  • How much you owe (30%) — Your credit utilization ratio is the amount of revolving credit you’re using compared to your total available credit. For example, if you have one credit card with a $2,000 balance and a $4,000 credit limit, your credit utilization ratio is 50%. Credit scoring models view using a larger percentage of your available credit as risky behavior, so high balances and maxed-out credit cards will negatively impact your score.
  • Length of credit history (15%) — This factor considers the age of your oldest account, newest account and the average age of all your credit accounts. In general, the longer you’ve been using credit responsibly, the higher your score will be.
  • Types of accounts (10%) — Credit scoring models favor people who use a mix of credit cards, installment loans, mortgages and other types of credit.
  • Recent credit history (10%) — Lenders view applying for and opening several new credit accounts within a short period as a sign of financial trouble and it’ll negatively impact your score.

Ready to shop around for a mortgage?







Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer

Individual NMLS ID #57916


American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle
Louisville, KY 40223
Company NMLS ID #1364



Text/call: 502-905-3708

email: kentuckyloan@gmail.com

https://kentuckyloan.blogspot.com/

How to qualify for a mortgage The type of mortgage you’re applying for determines the minimum requirements you’ll have to meet for your down payment, credit score, and debt-to-income ratio.  Find out what type of loan you might qualify for or what aspects of your finances you’ll need to improve to get a better shot at qualifying for a mortgage.  Loan Type	Min. Down Payment	Min. Credit Score	Max DTI	Property Type Conventional	3%	620	45%	Primary, secondary, investment VA	0%	none	none	Primary FHA	3.5%	500	50%	Primary USDA	0%	none	41%	Primary Keep in mind: The minimum down payment, minimum credit score, and maximum DTI shown in the table apply to mortgages used to purchase a primary residence. While you can use a conventional loan or a jumbo loan to purchase a home for another purpose, you might need a larger down payment, a higher credit score, more cash reserves, or all three.  Credit score needed to buy a house Mortgage lending is risky, and lenders want a way to quantify that risk. They use your three-digit credit score to gauge the risk of loaning you money since your credit score helps predict your likelihood of paying back a loan on time. Lenders also consider other data, such as your income, employment, debts and assets to decide whether to offer you a loan.  Different lenders and loan types have different borrower requirements, loan terms and minimum credit scores. Here are the requirements for some of the most common types of mortgages.  Conventional loan Minimum credit score: 620  A conventional loan is a mortgage that isn’t backed by a federal agency. Most mortgage lenders offer conventional loans, and many lenders sell these loans to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac — two government-sponsored enterprises. Conventional loans can have either fixed or adjustable rates, and terms ranging from 10 to 30 years.  You can get a conventional loan with a down payment as low as 3% of the home’s purchase price, so this type of loan makes sense if you don’t have enough for a traditional down payment. However, if your down payment is less than 20%, you’re required to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI), which is an insurance policy designed to protect the lender if you stop making payments. You can ask your servicer to cancel PMI once the principal balance of your mortgage falls below 80% of the original value of your home.  FHA loan Minimum credit score (10% down): 500  Minimum credit score (3.5% down): 580  FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), a part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The FHA incentivizes lenders to make mortgage loans available to borrowers who might not otherwise qualify by guaranteeing the federal government will repay the mortgage if the borrower stops making payments. This makes an FHA loan a good option if you have a lower credit score.  FHA loans come in 15- or 30-year terms with fixed interest rates. Unlike conventional mortgages, which only require PMI for borrowers with less than 20% down, all FHA borrowers must pay an up-front mortgage insurance premium (MIP) and an annual MIP, as long as the loan is outstanding.  VA loan Minimum credit score: N/A  VA loans are mortgages backed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA guarantees loans made by VA-approved lenders to qualifying veterans or service members of the U.S. armed forces, or their spouses. This type of loan is a great option for veterans and their spouses, especially if they don’t have the best credit and don’t have enough for a down payment.  VA loans are fixed-rate mortgages with 10-, 15-, 20- or 30-year terms.  Most VA loans don’t require a down payment or monthly mortgage insurance premiums. However, they do require a one-time VA funding fee, that ranges from 1.4% to 3.6% of the loan amount.  USDA loan Minimum credit score: N/A  The U.S. Department of Agriculture guarantees loans for borrowers interested in buying homes in certain rural areas. USDA loans don’t require a minimum down payment, but you have to meet the USDA’s income eligibility limits, which vary by location.  All USDA mortgages have fixed interest rates and 30-year repayment terms.  USDA-approved lenders must pay an up-front guarantee fee of up to 3.5% of the purchase price to the USDA. That fee can be passed on to borrowers and financed into the home loan. If the home you want to buy is within an eligible rural area (defined by the USDA) and you meet the other requirements, this could be a great loan option for you.  What else do mortgage lenders consider? Your credit score isn’t the only factor lenders consider when reviewing your loan application. Here are some of the other factors lenders use when deciding whether to give you a mortgage.  Debt-to-income ratio — Your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is the amount of debt payments you make each month (including your mortgage payments) relative to your gross monthly income. For example, if your mortgage payments, car loan and credit card payments add up to $1,800 per month and you have a $6,000 monthly income, your debt-to-income ratio would be $1,800/$6,000, or 30%. Most conventional mortgages require a DTI ratio no greater than 36%. However, you may be approved with a DTI up to 45% if you meet other requirements. Employment history — When you apply for a mortgage, lenders will ask for proof of employment — typically two years’ worth of W-2s and tax returns, as well as your two most recent pay stubs. Lenders prefer to work with people who have stable employment and consistent income. Down payment — Putting money down to buy a home gives you immediate equity in the home and helps to ensure the lender recoups their loss if you stop making payments and they need to foreclose on the home. Most loans — other than VA and USDA loans — require a down payment of at least 3%, although a higher down payment could help you qualify for a lower interest rate or make up for other less-than-ideal aspects of your mortgage application. The home’s value and condition — Lenders want to ensure the home collateralizing the loan is in good condition and worth what you’re paying for it. Typically, they’ll require an appraisal to determine the home’s value and may also require a home inspection to ensure there aren’t any unknown issues with the property. How is your credit score calculated? Most talk of credit scores makes it sound as if you have only one score. In fact, you have several credit scores, and they may be used by different lenders and for different purposes.  The three national credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — collect information from banks, credit unions, lenders and public records to formulate your credit score. The most common and well-known scoring model is the FICO Score, which is based on the following five factors:  Payment history (35%) — A history of late payments will drag your score down, as will negative information from bankruptcies, foreclosures, repossessions or accounts referred to collections. How much you owe (30%) — Your credit utilization ratio is the amount of revolving credit you’re using compared to your total available credit. For example, if you have one credit card with a $2,000 balance and a $4,000 credit limit, your credit utilization ratio is 50%. Credit scoring models view using a larger percentage of your available credit as risky behavior, so high balances and maxed-out credit cards will negatively impact your score. Length of credit history (15%) — This factor considers the age of your oldest account, newest account and the average age of all your credit accounts. In general, the longer you’ve been using credit responsibly, the higher your score will be. Types of accounts (10%) — Credit scoring models favor people who use a mix of credit cards, installment loans, mortgages and other types of credit. Recent credit history (10%) — Lenders view applying for and opening several new credit accounts within a short period as a sign of financial trouble and it’ll negatively impact your score. Ready to shop around for a mortgage?        Joel Lobb Mortgage Loan Officer Individual NMLS ID #57916   American Mortgage Solutions, Inc. 10602 Timberwood Circle Louisville, KY 40223 Company NMLS ID #1364    Text/call: 502-905-3708  email: kentuckyloan@gmail.com https://kentuckyloan.blogspot.com/      Email This BlogThis! Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Pinterest Labels: credit, Credit Score, Debt to Income Ratio, FHA Guidelines, FHA Kentucky Home Loans, Fico Score, Kentucky VA Loans, USDA loans  Joel Lobb, Mortgage Broker FHA, VA, KHC, USDA I have helped over 1300 Kentucky families buy or refinance their home over the last 20 years. Realizing that this is one of the biggest, most important financial transactions a family makes during their lifetime, I always feel honored and respected when I am chosen to originate their personal home loan. You can count on me to deliver on what I say, and I will always give you honest, up-front personal attention you deserve during the loan process. I have several advantages over the large banks in town. First, I can search and negotiate for your loan options through several different mortgage companies across the country to get you the best deal locally. Where most banks will offer offer you their one set of loan products. I have access to over 10 different mortgage companies to broker your loan through to get you the best pricing and loan products that may not fit into the bank's program due to credit, income, or other underwriting issues. You will not get lost in the shuffle like most borrowers do at the mega banks; you're just not a number at our company, you are a person and we will treat you like one throughout the entire process.

2023 Loan Limits for Kentucky VA and Kentucky FHA Loans

 

New 2023 Loan Limits for Kentucky VA and Kentucky FHA Loans

Kentucky VA loan limits received a massive increase for 2023. The standard Kentucky VA loan limit in 2023 is $726,200 for most U.S. counties, increasing from $647,200 in 2022.

Kentucky VA loan limits also increased for high-cost counties to $1,089,300 for a single-family home.

 

Kentucky VA loan limits do not represent a cap or max loan amount. Veterans with their full entitlement can get as much as a lender is willing to give them without needing a down payment. However, Veterans with one or more active VA loans or who have defaulted on a previous VA loan will encounter the limits, which will in part determine their zero-down buying power.

 

For Kentucky FHA loan limits, please click here to consult this page on the Hud.gov website as Loan Limits for FHA loans vary by county in Kentucky each 120 counties.

How does consumer credit counseling effects things on a Kentucky FHA or USDA loan in Kentucky ?

 KENTUCKY FHA GUIDELINES FOR CONSUEMR CREDIT COUNSELING

(J) Credit Counseling/Payment Plan (APPROVE/ELIGIBLE)Participating in a consumer credit counseling program does not require a downgrade to a manual underwriting.No explanation or other documentation is needed.

 

(K) Credit Counseling/Payment Plan (MANUAL UW) Participating in a consumer credit counseling program does not disqualify a Borrower from obtaining an FHA-insured Mortgage, provided the Mortgagee documents that:

  • one year of the payout period has elapsed under the plan;
  • the Borrower’s payment performance has been satisfactory and all required payments have been made on time; and
  • the Borrower has received written permission from the counseling agency to enter into the mortgage transaction.

 

 

KENTUCKY RURAL HOUSING USDA GUIDELINES FOR CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING 


CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING - DEBT MANAGEMENT PLANS

Credit counseling provides guidance and support to consumers which may include assistance to negotiate with creditors on behalf of the borrower to reduce interest rates, late fees, and agree upon a repayment plan. The credit score will reflect the degradation of credit due to participation in this plan. Credit accounts that are included in the repayment plan may continue to report as delinquent or as late pays. This is typical and will not be considered as recent adverse credit. Lenders must retain documentation to support the accounts included in the debt management plan and the applicable monthly payment. Lenders must include the monthly payment amount due for the counseling plan in the monthly liabilities.

GUS Accept/Accept with Full Documentation files:

No credit exception is required.

GUS Refer, Refer with Caution, and manually underwritten files:

The following must be documented and retained in the lender’s permanent loan file:

•One year of the payment period of the debt management plan has elapsed;

•All payments have been made on time; and

•Written permission from the counseling agency to recommend the applicant as acandidate for a new mortgage loan debt.

•No credit exception is required




How does consumer credit counseling effects things on a Kentucky FHA or USDA loan in Kentucky ?



How does consumer credit counseling effects things on a Kentucky FHA or USDA loan in Kentucky ?


How does consumer credit counseling effects things on a Kentucky FHA or USDA loan in Kentucky ?



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Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Text/call:      502-905-3708
fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com



Kentucky FHA Mortgage Guidelines in Video







Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Text/call:      502-905-3708
fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com

 


Can I get a Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?

 For many Kentucky first time buyers, saving for a down payment is one of the most challenging steps in fulfilling their dream of purchasing a home. Oftentimes, they know they can afford their potential monthly mortgages (which could be less or equal their current rents), but the upfront costs of buying, such as down payment and closing costs, may be too much for them to pay.

Can I get a Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan

This is why it's possible to get a little help in the form of a down payment gift from a family member or relative, close friend, or even a charitable organization. And it’s actually becoming more popular, especially among millennials. In the National Association of REALTORS® 2020 Generational Trends Report, 13 percent of home buyers (and 27 percent for ages 22 to 29) indicated their source of down payment to be a gift from their relative or friend. 

So if you’re lucky enough to find down payment fund as one of your gifts under the Christmas tree this year (or maybe you’re the one who wants to give it), it may not be as simple as opening your cash gift (or handing someone a wad of cash) and going straight to the lender to use it to buy a home. 

Down payment gift funds, whether you’re giving or receiving it, are closely regulated by lenders and must meet certain requirements. Here are certain rules that the gift giver and recipient should know to avoid trouble down the road.

Can I get a Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan

While we may automatically consider a family member, like parents or siblings, when thinking about who can give a mortgage down payment gift, there are other entities who could also be eligible gift sources. But because cash can come with strings attached, and lenders want to make sure that the gift money is nothing but a gift (which will be discussed later on), there are restrictions on who can give money (or who you can give money to) to help purchase a home.


For conventional loans

If you are getting a loan through Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, gifts can only be from a family member or relative. This may be your spouse, child, siblings, parents, grandparents, or anyone related by blood, marriage, adoption, or legal guardianship. Soon-to-be family members such as your domestic partner, fiancรฉ, or even future in-laws are also eligible to give funds for a down payment.

For FHA loans

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) has its own set of rules when it comes to giving or receiving down payment gifts, although they offer a broader eligibility range. If you are getting an FHA loan, you can receive down payment funds from family members, friends who have a clearly defined and documented interest in your life, employers, labor unions, government agencies, and even charitable organizations. 

For USDA and VA home loans

VA loans (backed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs) and USDA mortgages (given by the U.S. Department of Agriculture)may have fewer restrictions, but the down payment gift funds cannot come from anyone who would benefit from the proceeds of the purchase, such as the seller, developer, builder, your real estate agent, and some other entity.

Can I get a Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan

There are no limits on the amount of money someone can give you for a down payment or to cover closing costs. However, rules still apply depending on the type of loan and property you're purchasing. Some types of loans may need you to contribute a certain amount of the down. The key is to check with your lender for the latest regulations on how much you can really use.

Likewise, there can be tax implications on the person giving the gift funds. They may be liable if the amount exceeds the gift tax exclusion limit. As of 2020, for instance, any individual can give funds up to $15,000 without a tax penalty. On the other hand, parents who are married and are filing jointly can give up to $30,000 per child for a mortgage down payment (or any other purpose), without incurring the gift tax. For a down payment gift that exceeds the said amounts, the donor must file a gift tax return to disclose the gift. 

Can I get a Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan
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  • You need to confirm the relationship between you and the giver and provide the right paperwork.

If you're fortunate enough to have a family member or any eligible entity who can give you funds towards your home’s down payment, you’ll need to confirm your relationship with the gift-giver and provide your mortgage underwriter more information about where the funds came from.

For lenders to confirm that the new money isn’t a loan, you’ll need these things:

1. A down payment gift letter - If your lender has a template letter for this purpose, you will need to send it to the funds’ donor. If there isn’t a template, you might want to ask what information should be included so you can draft your own.

The letter typically includes details about the gift-giver, such as the name, address, contact phone, relationship to the borrower, and address of the property to be purchased. The date when the gift was transferred and the amount of funds given to the borrower must also be indicated. The donor should also write a sentence explaining that the fund is a gift and that there isn’t any expectation of repayment. The letter must be signed by both the gift-giver and the borrower.

2. The gift-giver’s bank statements - This is to show they have the funds to give the buyer as much money as promised.

3. A bank slip from the buyer’s account - This is to indicate when the money was transferred, to verify that the cash is from a legitimate source and that the borrower has an appropriate relationship with the donor, and to confirm the information provided in the letter.

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  • Remember: you can't pay back the gift.

Down payment gift funds need to be just like that—a gift and not a loan that is expected to be paid. You need to make it clear with your mortgage lender that the money you received was entirely gifted and not something that you need to pay back eventually, because by then it will be considered mortgage or loan fraud. Besides, it can also put your loan qualification at risk since your debt-to-income ratio will be factored when you get a mortgage. 

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  • Try to make it a “seasoned” gift money.

It might make more sense to try and make your gift money “seasoned”, especially if you know that someone is going to help you buy a home (often in the case of parents or other relatives). Lenders refer to it as seasoned money when it has been sitting in your bank account for some time, at least for two months. When the gifted money is given in advance, you often don't have to worry about writing gift letter documentation.

Bottom Line

Down payment gift funds make it easier for first-time home buyers to afford a home. If you anticipate accepting help, remember to consider the rules above so you can accept such a gift in a proper manner. Be upfront with your mortgage lender if you plan on using gift funds for the down payment. Don't forget to also talk to the individual or entities who are planning to give you money about the tax implications and other considerations.




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Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?



Joel Lobb
Mortgage Loan Officer
Individual NMLS ID #57916

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Text/call:      502-905-3708
fax:            502-327-9119
email:
          kentuckyloan@gmail.com

Gift for A Down payment on a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?