Showing posts with label Credit Score First Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky KHC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Credit Score First Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky KHC. Show all posts

Louisville Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs


Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs



Qualifying for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan


If you are a potential Louisville Kentucky First Time home buyer first time home buyer in Louisville Kentucky, we welcome you! It is our utmost desire to assist you in reaching the goal of buying your first home. 

We've gathered the most helpful, beneficial resources together on this page to make things as easy as possible for you.


We have access to all the Louisville Kentucky First Time home Buyers programs including, FHA, VA, KHC, and USDA, Rural Housing Zero Down home loans--


What is available for first time home buyer financial programs in Kentucky?

First-Time Homebuyers Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs


The first place to start in that search is the Kentucky Housing Corporation. They provide generous assistance to first time home buyers in the form of grants to help with the down payment as well as closing costs.

The Kentucky Housing Corporation has a down payment assistance program for eligible homebuyers who meet specific moderate-income limits to help with down payment and/or closing costs. Check and see what is available and if you qualify....



There are other Louisville, Kentucky first time homeownership programs available through the Kentucky Housing Corporation

In addition to the state programs, there are federal funds and grants available to residents and first time home buyers in Kentucky through the Homes and Communities program of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development

On their website you'll find complete grant information, application forms, description of available funds, as well as many other helpful tools.

Every potential first time home buyer should investigate what they have to offer. 

You can visit the website by clicking on US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development. 

Finally, there is a website that lists all grant programs available through the federal government, Grants.gov

Louisville, Kentucky First time home buyers should plan to spend the required time investigating to determine how many specific grants they may qualify for.

You can visit the website by clicking here.


Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Grants and Loan Programs


Your household income and expenses

Lenders look at your income in ways other than the total amount; how you earn it is also important. For example, income from bonuses, commissions and overtime can vary from year to year. If these sources make up a large percentage of your income, your lender will want to know how reliable they are.

Your lender will also consider the relationship between your income and expenses. Generally, your fixed housing expenses (mortgage payment, insurance, and property taxes, but not repairs or maintenance) should not be more than 28 percent of your gross monthly income, although this is not an absolute rule. Your lender will also consider other long-term debts, such as car loans or college loans. It is a good idea to bring the following when you meet with your lender:

Income

Employment, salary and bonuses, and any other source of income for the past two years (bring your most recent pay stub, previous year’s W-2 forms, and tax returns if possible)
The most recent account statement showing the amount of any dividend and interest income you received during the past two years 

Official documentation to support the amount of any other regular income you may receive (alimony, child support, etc.) Job stability is a factor that a mortgage lender will look for, and two years at your current job helps, but this also is not an absolute requirement. If you change jobs but stay in the same line of work, you should not have a problem — especially if the job change is an advancement or increase in income.

Credit score

Your credit score also helps to predict how likely you are to repay the mortgage debt. Credit scores will determine if you qualify for the loan, what your rate is, and mortgage insurance payments each month. Typical fico scores wanted for an automated approval run around 580 for an FHA loan and VA loan, 620 for a USDA, 620 for a KHC Loan with Down Payment Assistance, and 620 for an AU approval for Fannie Mae Loan.

Personal assets

Current balances and recent statements for any bank accounts, including checking and savings
Most recent account statement showing current market value of any investments you may have, such as stocks, bonds or certificates of deposit
Documentation showing interest in retirement funds
Face amount and cash value of life insurance policies
Value of significant pieces of personal property, including automobiles
Debt Information
The balances and account numbers of your current loans and debts, including car loans, credit card balances and any other loans you may have 

Underwriting

The lender does the best possible job of ensuring that a borrower qualifies for a loan. The final decision, however, rests with the lender's underwriter, who measures the total risk that the specific investor, who backs up the loan, is taking. Each investor (or investment company) has its own underwriting guidelines (often using statistical models), so while the underwriters evaluate many of the same factors as the lenders, they may look more closely at some areas than others, depending on the guidelines.

 For example, while the lender may have pre-approved you before you chose a home, by the time you get to underwriting, you will have chosen the property you want to buy, and the underwriter will review the property details closely. 

However, most of the information used is the same as that used by the lender, but it may be evaluated differently. The underwriter will evaluate the borrower's ability to pay (income), willingness to pay (credit history), and the collateral (property). As underwriters analyze each of these risks (although this is not a complete list), here are some possible guidelines they may use:

Income

Is the income sufficient to repay the loan? Ratio guidelines of 31 percent payment-to-income and 43 percent total debt-to-income are standard, but some programs allow for higher ratios. This is the typical manual underwrite for a score that does not fit the current Automated Underwriting Engines used for Fannie Mae (DO), FHA, VA, USDA and Rural Housing (GUS) 

Is the income stable from month to month and year to year? 


Has the borrower been on his/her current job and in the same industry for a sufficient amount of time? 

A minimum of two years is the standard guideline, but exceptions can be made.

Can the income be verified? 

2 years taxes, last 30 days of paystubs 


Credit

Does the borrower have a good credit score-Typically 760 or higher will yield the best rates and lowest mortgage insurance for a conventional loan? FHA mortgage insurance and VA mortgage insurance is the same no matter what your credit score is. 
 

Does the borrower have late payments, collections, or a bankruptcy? 


If so, is there an explanation that can be provided for the late payments/collections/bankruptcy? 
FHA, VA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy. 
 
Fannie Mae requires 4-7 years after a bankruptcy. 
 
Does the borrower have excessive monthly debts to repay? Typical Debt to income ratios for a no money down loan are limited to 45% of your total gross monthly income for a USDA or KHC loan.
Is the borrower maxed out on credit cards? 

Pay down your credit card balances to less than 25% of your credit limits before you apply for a mortgage loan.


The down payment

A down payment is a percentage of your home's value. The type of mortgage you choose determines the down payment you will need. It can range from zero to 20 percent, or more if you wish.
A number of loans are available that do not require high down payments, particularly for first-time home buyers. 

FHA loans, for example, may require less than 5 percent down, and veterans or those on active duty in the military can obtain loans with no down payment at all. 

USDA loans are offered to rural home buyers with a no down payment option just like VA loans.

In addition to down payment assistance offered through Kentucky Housing where you don't have to put a down payment down with income caps for both KHC and USDA loans.

First-Time Home Buyer Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Programs




American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3

Louisville, KY 40223


Company ID #1364 | MB73346


Text/call 502-905-3708


kentuckyloan@gmail.com



The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only. The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines. This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
, NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). I lend in the following states: Kentucky




Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs


 

• At least 3%-5% down

 
 Closing costs will vary on which rate you choose and the lender. Typically the higher the rate, the lesser closing costs due to the lender giving you a lender credit back at closing for over par pricing. Also, called a no-closing costs option. You have to weigh the pros and cons to see if it makes sense to forgo the lower rate and lower monthly payment for the higher rate and less closing costs.
 
Fico scores needed start at 620, but most conventional lenders will want a higher score to qualify for the 3-5% minimum down payment requirements Most buyers using this loan have high credit scores (over 720) and at least 5% down.
 
The rates are a little higher compared to FHA, VA, or USDA loan but the mortgage insurance is not for life of loan and can be rolled off when you reach 80% equity position in home.
 
Conventional loans require 4-7 years removed from Bankruptcy and foreclosure.
 

Max Conventional loan limits are set at $647,200 for 2022 in Kentucky

 
 
 
 
If you meet income eligibility requirements and are looking to settle in a rural area, you might qualify for the Kentucky USDA Rural Housing program. The program guarantees qualifying loans, reducing lenders’ risk and encouraging them to offer buyers 100% loans. That means Kentucky home buyers don’t have to put any money down, and even the “upfront fee” (a closing cost for this type of loan) can be rolled into the financing.
 
Fico scores usually wanted for this program center around 620 range, with most lenders wanting a 640 score so they can obtain an automated approval through GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting system, and it will dictate your max loan pre-approval based on your income, credit scores, debt to income ratio and assets.
 
They also allow for a manual underwrite, which states that the max house payment ratios are set at 29% and 41% respectively of your income.
 
They loan requires no down payment, and the current mortgage insurance is 1% upfront, called a funding fee, and .35% annually for the monthly mi payment. Since they recently reduced their mi requirements, USDA is one of the best options out there for home buyers looking to buy in an rural area.
 
A rural area typically will be any area outside the major cities of Louisville, Lexington, Paducah, Bowling Green, Richmond, Frankfort, and parts of Northern  Kentucky .
 
There is aπŸ‘‰πŸ‘‰ map link  see the qualifying areas.
 

New Income limits for most counties (*) in Kentucky are $91,900 for a  4 unit household and household families of five or more + can make up to  $121,300.

The Northern Kentucky Counties (***) of Boon, Kenton, Campbell, Bracken, Gallatin, and Pendleton are $99,250 for a household of four or less and up to $130,000 for a family of five or more.

Remember,  Jefferson County Kentucky, Fayette County Kentucky are not eligible for USDA loans.

 
USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy and foreclosure.
 

There is no max USDA loan limit.

 
 
 
 
FHA loans are good for home buyers with lower credit scores and no much down, or with down payment assistance grants. FHA will allow for grants, gifts, for their 3.5% minimum investment and will go down to a 500 credit score.
 
The current mortgage insurance requirements are kind of steep when compared to USDA, VA , but the rates are usually good so it can counteracts the high mi premiums. As I tell borrowers, you will not have the loan for 30 years, so don’t worry too much about the mi premiums.
 
The mi premiums are for life of loan like USDA.
 
FHA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and 3 years removed from foreclosure.
 

Maximum FHA loan limits in Kentucky are set at $420,680 for 2022…If you are looking at a larger loan amount, then you would need to look at doing a conventional loan which has a max loan amount of $647,200.00



 
 
VA loans are for veterans and active duty military personnel. The loan requires no down payment and no monthly mi premiums, and no minimum credit score , saving you on the monthly payment. It does have an funding fee like USDA, but it is higher starting at 2% for first time use, and 3% for second time use. The funding fee is financed into the loan, so it is not something you have to pay upfront out of pocket.
 
VA loans can be made anywhere, unlike the USDA restrictions, and there is no income household limit and there is no max loan in Kentucky for 2022, but it does now carry higher mortgage insurance premiums in the form of New





  • Regular DAP

    • Purchase price up to $346,644 with Secondary Market.
    • Assistance in the form of a loan up to $6,000 in $100 increments.
    • Repayable over a ten-year term at 5.50 percent.
    • Available to all KHC first-mortgage loan recipients.

    Affordable DAP

    • Purchase price up to $346,644​ with Secondary Market.
    • Assistance up to $6,000.
    • Repayable over a ten-year term at 1.00 percent.
    • Borrowers must meet Affordable D​AP income limits.

    ​MORE ABOUT DOWN PAYMENT AND CLOSING COSTS

    • No liquid asset review and no limit on borrower reserves.
    • Specific credit underwriting standards may apply to down payment programs
    •  
    •  


About FICO® Scores

 


About FICO® Scores

CollapseWhat is a credit score?

A credit score is a number that summarizes your credit risk to lenders, or the likelihood that you’ll pay the lender back the amount you borrowed plus interest. The score is based on a snapshot of your credit report(s) at one of the three major credit bureaus—Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®—at a particular point in time, and helps lenders evaluate your credit risk. Your credit score can influence the credit that’s available to you and the terms, such as interest rate, that lenders offer you.

CollapseWhat is a credit bureau?

A credit bureau, also known as a consumer reporting agency, collects and stores individual credit information and provides it to creditors so they can make decisions on granting loans and other credit activities. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders, and credit card issuers. The three largest credit bureaus in the U.S. are Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®.

CollapseWhat are FICO® Scores?

FICO® Scores are the most widely used credit scores and are used in over 90% of U.S. lending decisions. Your FICO® Scores (you have more than one) are based on the data generated from your credit reports at the three major credit bureaus, Experian®, TransUnion® and Equifax®. Each of your FICO® Scores is a three-digit number summarizing your credit risk, that predicts how likely you are to pay back your credit obligations as agreed.

CollapseWhat it the highest credit score?

Most credit scoring models follow a credit score range of 300 to 850 with that 850 being the highest score you can have. However, there can be other ranges for different models, some of which are customized for a particular industry (credit card, auto lending, or insurance for example). While the majority follow the 300 to 850 range, there are some scores (e.g., FICO® Bankcard Score) that range from 250 to 900 and others that may use other score ranges. For more information on the different scoring models, view Understanding the difference between credit scores.

CollapseWhy do FICO® Scores fluctuate?

There are many reasons why your score may change. The information on your credit report changes each time lenders report new activity to the credit bureau. So, as the information in your credit report at that bureau changes, your FICO® Scores may also change. Keep in mind that certain events such as late payments or bankruptcy can lower your FICO® Scores quickly.

FICO® Scores consider five main categories of information in your credit report.

  • Your payment history
  • The amount of money you currently owe
  • The length of your credit history
  • New credit accounts
  • Types of credit in use

CollapseWhat are the minimum requirements to produce a FICO® Score?

In order for a FICO® Score to be calculated, a credit report must contain these minimum requirements:

  • At least one account that has been open for six months or more.
  • At least one account that has been reported to the credit reporting agency within the past six months.
  • No indication of deceased on the credit report (Please note: if you share an account with another person and the other account holder is reported deceased, it is important to check your credit report to make sure you are not impacted).

CollapseDoes a FICO® Score alone determine whether I get credit?

No. Most lenders use a number of factors to make credit decisions, including a FICO® Score. Lenders may look at information such as the amount of debt you are able to handle reasonably given your income, your employment history, and your credit history. Based on their review of this information, as well as their specific underwriting policies, lenders may extend credit to you even with a low FICO® Score, or decline your request for credit even with a high FICO® Score.

CollapseHow long will negative information remain on my credit reports?

It depends on the type of negative information. Here’s the basic breakdown of how long different types of negative information will remain on your credit reports:

  • Late payments: 7 years from the original delinquency date.
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcies: 10 years from the filing date.
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcies: 7 years from the filing date.
  • Collection accounts: 7 years from the original delinquency date of the account
  • Public Record: Generally 7 years

Keep in Mind: For all of these negative items, the older they are the less impact they will have on your FICO® Scores. For example, a collection that is 5 years old will hurt much less than a collection that is 5 months old.

CollapseAre FICO® Scores unfair to minorities?

No. FICO® Scores do not consider your gender, race, nationality or marital status. In fact, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits lenders from considering this type of information when issuing credit. Independent research has shown that FICO® Scores are not unfair to minorities or people with little credit history. FICO® Scores have proven to be an accurate and consistent measure of repayment for all people who have some credit history. In other words, at a given FICO® Score, non-minority and minority applicants are equally likely to pay as agreed.

CollapseHow are FICO® Scores calculated for married couples?

Married couples don’t share joint FICO® Scores; each person has their own individual credit report, which is used to calculate FICO® Scores, and isn’t impacted by their spouse’s credit history. However, married couples should be mindful of the potential impact of opening joint credit accounts. For example, if you get a new credit card in both spouses’ names, and there is a late payment on that account, the late payment will impact both individuals’ FICO® Scores.

CollapseHow can I access my credit report?

By federal law, you are entitled to one free credit report every 12 months from each credit reporting company, TransUnion®, Equifax®, and Experian®. Find them at annualcreditreport.com. Take advantage of this service annually to ensure the information on your credit report is current and accurate.



Impacts to FICO® Scores

CollapseWill closing a credit card account impact my FICO® Score?

It is possible that closing a credit account may have a negative impact depending on a few factors. FICO® Scores may consider your “credit utilization rate”, which looks at your total used credit in relation to your total available credit. Essentially, it measures how much of your available credit you are actually using. The more of your credit that you use, the higher your utilization rate and high credit utilization rates may negatively impact your FICO® Score. Before you close any credit card account, Wells Fargo recommends that you should first consider whether you really need to close the account or if your real intention is just to stop using that credit card. If you really just want to stop using that card, it may make sense if you stop using the card and put it somewhere for safe keeping in case of an emergency. It’s also important to note that length of your credit history accounts for 15% of your FICO® Score calculation. Therefore, having credit card accounts that are open and in good standing for a long time may affect your FICO® Score.

CollapseHow does refinancing impact my FICO® Score?

Refinancing and loan modifications may affect your FICO® Scores in a few areas. How much these affect the score depends on whether it’s reported to the consumer reporting agencies as the same loan with changes or as an entirely new loan. There are many reasons why a score may change. FICO® Scores are calculated using many different pieces of credit data in your credit report. This data is grouped into five categories: payment history (35%), amounts owed (30%), length of credit history (15%), new credit (10%) and credit mix (10%). If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as the same loan with changes, two pieces of information associated with the loan modification may affect your score: the new credit inquiry and changes to the amounts owed. If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as a “new” loan, your score could still be affected by the new credit inquiry and an increase in amounts owed,— along with the additional impact of a new “open date” which may affect the credit history category. In the end, a new or recent open date typically indicates that it is a new credit obligation and, as a result, may impact the score more than if the terms of the existing loan are simply changed.

CollapseHow do FICO® Scores consider loan shopping?

In general, if you are “loan shopping” - meaning that you are applying for the same type of loan with similar amounts with multiple lenders in a short period of time - your FICO® Score will consider your “shopping” as a single credit inquiry on your score if the shopping occurs within a short time period (30 to 45 day) depending on which FICO® Score version is used by your lenders.

CollapseWhat are the different categories of late payments and do they impact FICO® Scores?

A history of payments is the largest factor in FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores consider late payments in these general areas; how recent the late payments are, how severe the late payments are, and how frequently the late payments occur. So this means that a recent late payment could be more damaging to a FICO® Score than a number of late payments that happened a long time ago. Late payments are listed on credit reports by how late the payments are. Typically, creditors report late payments in one of these categories: 30-days late, 60-days late, 90-days late, 120-days late, 150-days late, or charge off (written off as a loss because of severe delinquency). Of course a 90-day late is worse than a 30-day late, but the important thing to understand is that people who continually pay their bills on time tend to appear less risky to lenders. However, for people who continue not to pay debt, and their creditor either charges it off or sends it to a collection agency, it is considered a significant event with regard to a score and will likely have a severe negative impact.

CollapseHow does a bankruptcy impact my FICO® Score?

A bankruptcy is considered a very negative event by FICO® Scores. As long as the bankruptcy is listed on your credit report, it will be factored into your scores. How much of an impact it will have on your score will depend on your entire credit profile. As the bankruptcy item ages, its impact on a FICO® Score gradually decreases. Typically, here is how long you can expect bankruptcies to remain on your credit reports (from the date filed):

  • Chapter 11 and 7 bankruptcies up to 10 years.
  • Completed Chapter 13 bankruptcies up to 7 years.

These dates and time periods refer to the public record item associated with filing for bankruptcy. All of the individual accounts included in the bankruptcy should be removed from your credit reports after 7 years.

CollapseHow do public records and judgments impact FICO® Scores?

Public records are legal documents created and maintained by Federal and local governments, which are usually accessible to the public. Some public records, such as divorces, are not considered by FICO® Scores, but adverse public records, which include bankruptcies, are considered by FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores may be affected by the mere presence of an adverse public record, whether paid or not. Adverse public records will have less effect on a FICO® Score as time passes, but they can remain in your credit reports for up to ten years based on what type of public record it is.

CollapseWhat are inquiries and how do they impact FICO® Scores?

Inquiries may or may not affect FICO® Scores. Credit inquiries are classified as either “hard inquiries” or “soft inquiries”—only hard inquiries have an effect on FICO® Scores.

Soft inquiries are all credit inquiries where your credit is NOT being reviewed by a prospective lender. FICO® Scores do not take into account any involuntary (soft) inquiries made by businesses with which you did not apply for credit, inquiries from employers, or your own requests to see your credit report. Soft inquiries also include inquiries from businesses checking your credit to offer you goods or services (such as promotional offers by credit card companies) and credit checks from businesses with which you already have a credit account. If you are receiving FICO® Scores for free from a business with which you already have a credit account, there is no additional inquiry made on your credit report. FICO® Scores take into account only voluntary (hard) inquiries that result from your application for credit. Hard inquiries include credit checks when you’ve applied for an auto loan, mortgage, credit card or other types of loans. Each of these types of credit checks count as a single inquiry. Inquiries may have a greater impact if you have few accounts or a short credit history. Large numbers of inquiries also mean greater risk.

CollapseHow does applying for new credit impact my FICO® Score?

Applying for new credit only accounts for about 10% of a FICO® Score. Exactly how much applying for new credit affects your score depends on your overall credit profile and what else is already in your credit reports. For example, applying for new credit may have a greater impact on your FICO® Scores if you only have a few accounts or a short credit history. That said, there are definitely a few things to be aware of depending on the type of credit you are applying for. When you apply for credit, a credit check or “inquiry” can be requested to check your credit standing.

Credit Scores FHA Loans Louisville Kentucky KHC First Time Home Buyer Credit Score

What is the minimum Credit Score Needed to Buy a House and get a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?

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 Credit Scores and Kentucky Mortgage Loans, Fannie Mae, FHA, FHA Loan in Kentucky, Fico Score, Kentucky VA Home Loans, USDA, USDA Rural Housing Guidelines, VA





Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky
Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky


5 POPULAR PROGRAMS THAT KENTUCKY HOME BUYERS USE TO PURCHASE THEIR FIRST HOME.

• At least 3%-5% down Closing costs will vary on which rate you choose and the lender. Typically the higher the rate, the lesser closing costs due to the lender giving you a lender credit back at closing for over par pricing. Also, called a no-closing costs option. You have to weigh the pros and cons to see if it makes sense to forgo the lower rate and lower monthly payment for the higher rate and less closing costs.

Fico scores needed start at 620, but most conventional lenders will want a higher score to qualify for the 3-5% minimum down payment requirements Most buyers using this loan have high credit scores (over 720) and at least 5% down.

The rates are a little higher compared to FHA, VA, or USDA loan but the mortgage insurance is not for life of loan and can be rolled off when you reach 80% equity position in home.Conventional loans require 4-7 years removed from Bankruptcy and foreclosure.Max Conventional loan limits are set at $510,400  for 2020 in Kentucky

If you meet income eligibility requirements and are looking to settle in a rural area, you might qualify for the KY USDA Rural Housing program. The program guarantees qualifying loans, reducing lenders’ risk and encouraging them to offer buyers 100% loans. That means Kentucky home buyers don’t have to put any money down, and even the “upfront fee” (a closing cost for this type of loan) can be rolled into the financing.
Fico scores usually wanted for this program center around 620 range, with most lenders wanting a 640 score so they can obtain an automated approval through GUS. GUS stands for the Guaranteed Underwriting system, and it will dictate your max loan pre-approval based on your income, credit scores, debt to income ratio and assets.
They also allow for a manual underwrite, which states that the max house payment ratios are set at 29% and 41% respectively of your income.

They loan requires no down payment, and the current mortgage insurance is 1% upfront, called a funding fee, and .35% annually for the monthly mi payment. Since they recently reduced their mi requirements, USDA is one of the best options out there for home buyers looking to buy in an rural area

A rural area typically will be any area outside the major cities of Louisville, Lexington, Paducah, Bowling Green, Richmond, Frankfort, and parts of Northern  Kentucky .There is a map link below to see the qualifying areas.
Thee is also a max household income limits with most cutoff starting at $86,400 for a family of four, and up to $115,000 for a family of five or more.USDA requires 3 years removed from bankruptcy and foreclosureThere is no max USDA loan limit.
FHA loans are good for home buyers with lower credit scores and no much down, or with down payment assistance grants. FHA will allow for grants, gifts, for their 3.5% minimum investment and will go down to a 580 credit score.
The current mortgage insurance requirements are kinda steep when compared to USDA, VA , but the rates are usually good so it can counteracts the high mi premiums. As I tell borrowers, you will not have the loan for 30 years, so don’t worry too much about the mi premiums.
THe mi premiums are for life of loan like USDA.
FHA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy and 3 years removed from foreclosure.Maximum FHA loan limits in Kentucky are set around $331,600 and below.
VA loans are for veterans and active duty military personnel. The loan requires no down payment and no monthly mi premiums, saving you on the monthly payment. It does have an funding fee like USDA, but it is higher starting at 2% for first time use, and 3% for second time use. The funding fee is financed into the loan, so it is not something you have to pay upfront out of pocket.
VA loans can be made anywhere, unlike the USDA restrictions, and there is no income household limit and no max loan limits in Kentucky
Most VA lenders I work with will want a 580 credit score, even though VA says in their guidelines there is  no minimum score, good luck finding a lender
VA requires 2 years removed from bankruptcy or foreclosure
Clear Cavirs needed to for a VA loan.
This type of loan is administered  by KHC in the state of Kentucky. They typically have $4500 to $6000 down payment assistance year around, that is in the form of a second mortgage that you pay back over 10 years.
Sometimes they will come to market with other down payment assistance and lower market rates to benefit lower income households with not a lot of money for down payment.KHC offers FHA, VA, USDA, and Conventional loans with their minimum credit scores being set at 620 for all programs. The conventional loan requirements at KHC requires 660 credit score.
The max debt to income ratios are set at 40% and 50% respectively.apply online for a kentucky first time home buyer loan


Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
Text/call 502-905-3708
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346

If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant's eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant 

 Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/




Estimated Sale Price: $110,000
• Rate - 3.75%
• APR - 4.854%
• Down payment - $3850.00
• Principal & Interest - $500.20
• Insurance (estimated) - $75
• Taxes - $47.92
• PMI - $74.56
TOTAL PAYMENT INCLUDING
TAXES + INSURANCE:
$697.68 a month!
*Rates effective 01/16/2020, based on 740 FICO score and subject to change. ARP may vary. Loan terms are fixed rate 30 year loans and payment will not rise over the life of the loan. Not all applicants will qualify for advertised terms and conditions, must meet underwriting guidelines and are subject to credit review and approval. This does not constitute a commitment to lend. The disclosed rates, payments, homeowners insurance and mortgage insurance are estimates and may vary according to lender guidelines. Property taxes based on current assessed value with homestead and mortgage exemptions in place. Equal Housing Lender.